Altered States: The United States and Japan since the Occupation

By Michael Schaller | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE -- ALTERED STATES: FROM COLD WAR TO NEW WORLD ORDER

NIXON'S economic shock, along with divisions among the Liberal Democrats over how to respond to the China opening, shaped the struggle to succeed Sato as prime minister. In a larger sense, Washington's foreign policy initiatives during the early 1970s signified the beginning of the end of the special dependency relationship that had prevailed between the United States and Japan since the Occupation. Over the next twenty years, the changing nature of the cold war, the evolution of a new world economy, and domestic forces would transform the Pacific alliance.

Minister of International Trade and Industry, Tanaka Kakuei -- dubbed the "computerized bulldozer" because of his tenacity, unusual flare for publicity, and contempt for bureaucrats -- easily outflanked his main Liberal Democratic rival, Foreign Minister Fukuda Takeo. Buoyed by the slogan "Don't miss the boat to China" and by a plan for massive domestic economic development, Tanaka won the LDP presidency and premiership in July 1972.

Like Nixon and Kissinger, Tanaka distrusted career bureaucrats and diplomats. He circumvented the foreign ministry by dispatching business leaders and members of opposition parties to sound out the Chinese on their terms for rapprochement. Zhou Enlai proved eager to accommodate Tanaka. In a humiliating rejection of the Japanese left, Zhou revealed that China no longer opposed the United States-Japan Security Treaty. If Japan recognized the PRC as the sole legitimate government of China and severed diplomatic ties with Taiwan, Zhou offered to drop demands for war reparations and tolerate Japan's continued commercial relations with Taiwan. 1

On August 31, 1972, Tanaka conferred with Nixon in Honolulu. He told the president he intended to establish full diplomatic ties with China,

-245-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Altered States: The United States and Japan since the Occupation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.