Strangers & Pilgrims: Female Preaching in America, 1740-1845

By Catherine A. Brekus | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1.
See the accounts published in the National Intelligencer, January 9, 1827; Newburyport Herald, January 19, 1827; and The New York Commercial Advertiser, January 11, 1827. Livermore published an impressive number of books during her lifetime; for a full listing, see the Bibliography. Not included in the Bibliography are three rare works that I could not locate: Millennial Tidings, no. 2 (publisher and date unknown); Millennial Tidings, no. 3 ( Philadelphia: published by Harriet Livermore, 1838); and The Sparrow, vol. 2, no. 1 ( Philadelphia, 1848). With the exception of two letters in the Abraham H. Cassel Collection (MSS 60, Juniata College, Huntingdon, Pa.), virtually all of her manuscripts have disappeared. For a contemporary account of her, see "Harriet Livermore," Soutern Literary Messenger 7, no. 2 ( February 1841): 156. See also C. C. Chase, "Harriet Livermore," Contributions of the Old Residents' Historical Association ( Lowell, Mass.) 4, no. 1 ( August 1888): 1723; Rebecca Davis, Gleanings from Merrimac Valley ( Portland, Maine: Hoyt, Fogg, and Donham, 1881); Samuel T. Livermore, Harriet Livermore, the "Pilgrim Stranger" ( Hartford: Case, Lockwood, and Brainard Company, 1884); Harvey L. Long, "Harriet Livermore: Guest of the Brethren," Brethren Life and Thought 24 (Autumn 1979): 220-24; John J. Currier, History of Newburyport, Massachusetts 1764-1909 ( Newburyport, Mass.: n.p., 1909), 2:476-80; and Elizabeth F. Hoxie, "Harriet Livermore, 'Vixen and Devotee,'" New England Quarterly 18 ( March 1945): 39-50. Livermore is also the subject of a fascinating doctoral dissertation by Cynthia Jüsson, "Federalist, Feminist, Revivalist: Harriet Livermore (1788-1868) and the Limits of Democratization in the Early Republic" ( Princeton Theological Seminary, 1994).
2.
Harriet Livermore, A Narration of Religious Experience ( Concord, N.H.: Jacob B. Moore, 1826), p. 276. Samuel Livermore, Harriet Livermore, p. 85.
3.
National Intelligencer, January 9, 1827; Newburyport Herald, January 19, 1827; The New Yorle Commercial Advertiser, January 11, 1827; and Charles Francis Adams, ed., Memoirs of John Quincy Adams, Comprising Portions of His Diary from 1795 to 1848 ( Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott, 1876), 10:7-8.
4.
Livermore complained that she was called "a disorderly character," "that eccentric individual," and "that crazy thing." Harriet Livermore, A Wreath from Jessamine Lawn; or, Free Grace, the Flower that Never Fades ( Philadelphia: printed for the authoress, 1831), 1:vi, and The Counsel of God, Immutable and Everlasting ( Philadelphia: L. R. Bailey, 1844), p. 22.
5.
One exception is an excellent article by Louis Billington, "Female Laborers in the Church: Women Preachers in the Northeastern United States, 1790-1840," Journal of American Studies ( Great Britain) 19 ( 1985): 369-94. See also William T. Noll, "Women as Clergy, and Laity in theNineteenth-Century Methodist Protestant Church,"

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