Tales of the Congaree

By Edward C. L. Adams; Robert G. O'Meally | Go to book overview

Old Sister

Bruser: Dey show is been a turn-over down to de old street; every kind er mix-up, niggers fighten every which a way.

Tad: Wuh de matter ail em?

Bruser: Ole Sister start sompen.

Scip: Dat's what Ole Sister good for. Carrying news and putten pizen out.

Bruser: She done put de pizen out up de street, den she pass on she look dat satisfy.

Scip: Pass on to put pizen out some wey else.

Tad: You ain't think all dat 'bout Ole Sister, is you? She look so Christian. Ain't I see her in church and meeten look like she always prayen and beggen God to forgive poor sinners.

Scip: She tongue forked just like a snake, one half on it drips prayers and tother half turns loose ruination, and den she talk so sweet 'bout God and how she give agvice and do everything she kin do to save her friend.

Voice: She wouldn't live long if she ain't been able to ring de heart strings loose from some er dem people she say she friend to, I done watch Ole Sister.

Scip: Ole Sister's business is other folks' business; she are a upright 'oman; she ain't never do no wrong; she know how to pray in de public place.

Voice: Dey tells me it was folks like Ole Sister 'casion Christ to be crucify.

Scip: Well, Christ pick out two thieves to go wid him, you ain't see no Ole Sisters hanging on de cross wid Him.

Voice: Wuh you reckon he do dat for? You think he ain't been able to die right if he had anything wusser than them thieves?

Scip: I ain't say nothin' 'bout that.

Tad: I reckon she so satisfy, she rub she self 'bout de way she and God live.

Tad: Ole Man Daniel tell we dat way back in slavery time dere been a nigger dey call him Gabel. He say Gabel been a kind man, double jinted and soft talking; everybody come to

-17-

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