Tales of the Congaree

By Edward C. L. Adams; Robert G. O'Meally | Go to book overview
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Old Sister in Heaven

Tad: Scip, is you all ever hear 'bout de big sturbance dey have in heaven?

Scip: Wuh kind er 'sturbance? Look like dey have nuff 'sturbance here. Dey ain't gone to havin' 'sturbance in heaven, is dey?

Bruser: Tell we, Tad.

Tad: I ain't know for certain it de trute, but I heared an' it soun' kind er pamelia to me.

Voice: Less we hear it, Ber Tad.

Tad: Well, one time one er dem ole sister dead an' slipped into heaven duenst a big storm. She ain't hit de bottom er de stairs 'fore she start sompen.

Voice: How you reckon she slip in, Tad?

Tad: Everything git so rough ole man Peter lef' de gate wid one er he chillun an' went to help Gabel close de windows. De wind was blowin' at such a rate it look like it were guh blow all de shutters off, an' rain was comin' so fast it was spilin' de carpet. It blowed some of de angels out er de trees. Angels was mess up all over heaven. Dere been so much feather scatter 'round it look like all de angels in heaven was moultin! It 'stroy some er dey nes', an' little angels was layin' all 'round on de ground cryin' an' hollerin'. A turn er dem been out in de garden playin', some un 'em was jes larnin' to fly. Some of dey wing feathers ain't start to sprout yet. Most of de chillun out in de garden ain't been ole enough to fly, dey was layin' all round under rose bush an' tangled up in vine. Gabel been so busy he ain't know he head from he foots. Part er de time he was workin' at de windows wid Peter, and den he would quit an' run all 'round an' blow he horn for help. It look like dey never was guh git dem chillun back in de mansion. Some er de chillun flewed up on de window sill. Dey'd hang dere a little while wid dey claws an' flop dey wings an' drap back on de groun'.

Voice: Tad, wey de Lord been? Ain't He kin stop all dat?

-23-

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