Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
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Whittier to the above. I shall be glad to have the magazine follow me, for we need independent voices these days.

Sincerely, Maxwell Anderson

1.
Sinclair ( 1878-1968), muckraking novelist and social reformer with strong socialist and pacifist commitments, published a magazine, Upton Sinclair's: for a Clear Peace and the Internation, from his home in Pasadena, California. For the magazine he had accepted an Anderson poem.
2.
"Star-Adventurer," Upton Sinclair's: for a Clear Peace and the Internation 1, no. 8 ( December, 1918): 15. No other text of the poem has been located, so it cannot be determined whether Sinclair altered it for publication. But line 10 contains a typographical error, printing "law-given" where the context calls for "law-giver."

5. TO FREMONT OLDER 1

Menlo Park, California
October 24, 1918

My dear Mr. Older,

I have been following the chapters of your story with all the interest and delight that used to carry me through Cooper and Stevenson. There is a distinct feeling of regret at the end of every chapter. The material is a revelation, and would have held however expressed, but you have made it absolutely convincing to me, and added that artistic turn that gives work permanence. It ought to be put in book form. 2

Sincerely, Maxwell Anderson

1.
Older ( 1856-1935), editor of the San Francisco Evening Call-Post, had made his name as a great reform journalist while editing the San Francisco Evening Bulletin ( 1895-July, 1918), whose editorial staff Anderson joined just after Older resigned. At the time of the present letter Older, in the Call-Post, was serializing an account of his newspaper crusades in the Bulletin. Begun with the intention of ridding San Francisco of crime and vice, the crusades ended with Older's development of a sympathetic understanding of criminals and a commitment to rehabilitative work with them.
2.
Later expanded, the series was published as My Own Story ( Oakland, Cal.: Post- Enquirer Publishing Co., 1925).

-6-

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Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958
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