Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
Save to active project
1.
Monro had not responded to no. 13 ( July 26, 1920) until November 12. In the response he listed the Anderson poems he wanted to publish in the Chapbook, including the epigrams, and apologized for being "one of the very slow and deliberate people of this world" (for the response, see no. 13, n. 2.).
2.
The Globe, on which Anderson and Hill worked at the time, shows no poetry column through January, 1921, when Anderson left the paper.
3.
The Measure: A Journal of Poetry, the first number of which appeared in March, 1921, was started by Anderson and Hill and several others, including Genevieve Taggard and George O'Neil. Anderson was the journal's first editor.

15. TO RIDGELY TORRENCE 1

[ New York City]
January 24, 1921

Dear Ridgely Torrence--

I'm enclosing a very slight little poem, hoping it will find favor for the New Republic. And hoping also you will be able to let the Measure have something soon.

Thank you for your interest, and the subscription. We are going to have a passing fair first number. 2 Would you mind telling me how you value Aiken? I like him immensely--but I fear I must be biased. Did you read the Portrait of One Dead? 3

Maxwell Anderson

1.
Torrence ( 1875- 1950), poet and playwright, was long the poetry editor of the New Republic ( 1920- 1934). He had taken a subscription to the Measure, and with the present letter Anderson sent him "St. Agnes' Morning," a poem Torrence ran in New Republic 26 ( March 16, 1921): 74.
2.
In the first number of the Measure, which appeared in March, 1921, Anderson had poems by Conrad Aiken, Robert Frost, and Wallace Stevens. Others represented were Padraic Colum, Frank E. Hill, Alfred Kreymborg, and Amy Murray.
3.
In a review of Aiken poetry Anderson called "The Portrait of One Dead," from The House of Dust: A Symphony ( 1920), "one of the most poignant lyrics ever written" ( "Conrad Aiken and the Minor Mode," Measure 3 [ May, 1921]: 25-26). Aiken was Anderson's favorite among modern poets, and the enthusiasm was lasting (see nos. 14 and 198). It is especially clear in the Measure during Anderson's editorship (March, April, and May, 1921). He included an Aiken poem in the first number ( "The Milestone," pp. 5-6) and made the third an Aiken number by running a long portion of "The Pilgrimage of Festus" (pp. 8-16) and devoting the review essay to Aiken (cited above). It was Aiken's artistry that most impressed Anderson, and in a later review he said that " Conrad Aiken has gone more deliberately to work to make himself a poet than anybody else who has been published in the United States, not even excepting Poe" ( "Word-Craft," Measure 18 [ August, 1922]: 16).

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?