Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
1.
Woollcott ( 1887- 1943), drama critic at the time on the New York Evening Sun. Anderson knew him very well, and Woollcott had helped What Price Glory into production by urging it on the producer Arthur Hopkins. The present letter, adapted from Twelfth Night, Act V, Scene 1, responds to Woollcott effusive review of What Price Glory, in which he called it the best play of the last ten years and said he would see it on every spare night of the season ( Evening Sun, September 6, 1924; collected in The Portable Woollcott [ 1946], pp. 441-43).

19. TO LELA AND DAN CHAMBERS*

[ 171 West 12th Street
New York City]
[ January 21, 1925]

Dear Lela and Dan-- 1

I may as well write you together because you'd read both letters anyway. I'm glad you're getting along well in the new place and hope you've fought through your share of sickness. We've had our troubled winters and they're hard to get through. Year before last was just about the limit.

We've had financial luck this year with the play, 2 and I've quit work on the papers and gone to writing for the stage in the hope that I can repeat. The show that's now running looks as if it would support us for a couple of years, and I have another finished and accepted which may go on in the spring--if not, then in the fall. 3

We're having a sloppy winter so far as weather is concerned. It rains almost as much as it snows and the streets are mountains of half frozen slush which ten or twelve thousand men work steadily for weeks at a time to throw into the river. We're to have a total eclipse of the sun here Saturday morning and I'm going out to the farm, where it will last longer, to get a good look at it. Kenneth and Quentin 4 went out last night. Ken is getting ready for mid-year exams at Columbia but seems quite unworried.

Dad and Beth both write frequently, Beth from business school at Buffalo and Dad from Richburg. 5 He's got a new Franklin which Kenneth says is a beauty. Ken was out to Estherville at Christmas-- that was his X-mas present from me. He still has the same girl and everything.

-21-

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