Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
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My book of poems is coming out in the spring.6 I'll send it when it's printed.

Goodluck, and let me hear from you both--

Max

1.
During the winter of 1924-25 Lela and Dan moved from Waukesha, Wisconsin, to Hinsdale, New York, where with Anderson's help they were buying a farm.
2.
What Price Glory.
3.
Probably Outside Looking In.
4.
Anderson's brother and son.
5.
Beth ( Dorothy Elizabeth), Anderson's sister. Richburg, town in southwestern New York near which Anderson had bought a farm where his father and mother lived in retirement.
6.
You Who Have Dreams.

20. TO ALEXANDER WOOLLCOTT

171 West 12
[ New York City]
[ 1925] 1

Dear Woollcott-- 2

Speaking as one more heard of as speaking than heard speaking I wish to say that the worst of being quoted is that one is occasionally quoted correctly. 3 Broun was indeed wrong about Processional; you were indeed wrong about Bird. However I do not disown you. I cling to a faith, perhaps tenuous, that though you are sometimes mistaken about actors you are infallible in regard to plays. 4

Maxwell Anderson

1.
Probably earlier in 1925 than October, when Anderson stopped using the West 12th Street address.
2.
In their reviews Broun and Woollcott had differed about John Howard Lawson Processional and Richard Bird portrayal of Marchbanks in Shaw Candida. Broun thought that Bird's poor performance ruined the current production of Shaw's great play ( World, December 13, 1924, p. 11, col. 3) and that Processional, though artistically rough, had the markings of the great American play ( World, January 13, 1925, p. 9, col. 4). Woollcott, on the other hand, thought that Bird had perfectly realized his role ( Evening Sun, December 13, 1924, p. 7, cols. 1-2) and that Processional was pretentious and boring ( Evening Sun, January 13, 1925, p. 24, cols. 1-2). The controversy over the two matters enlivened their columns through the entire season.

-22-

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