Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

to be interrupted. I doubt that I shall have time for a vacation and certainly I won't lecture on any subject. You may, of course, use any part of the Carnegie text which appeals to you. 3

In regard to the judges, I wish I could escape reading the plays but I have nothing to suggest and don't know how I can get out of it. Nobody else will read them or care whether they're read or not.

I haven't written Sandoe yet but found his paper excellent, myself hardly deserving of it. 4

I guess that's all except my gratitude and my fervent wish that you are never ill again.

Sincerely

Maxwell

1.
During the previous fall Prof. Bailey had sent Anderson the three best scripts from the verse play competition at Stanford, including Souvenir de la Malmaison by Dorothy Dow, winner of the 1937 Maxwell Anderson Award. More recently she had asked him to take part in the awards ceremony at Stanford in the fall of 1938.
2.
See no. 58.
3.
"The Arts as Motive Power," delivered as the Founder's Day Address at Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, on October 14, 1937, and on October 17 published in the New York Times, sec. 11, p. 1, cols. 6-8, p. 2, cols. 1-5 (included as "Whatever Hope We Have" in The Essence of Tragedy and Other Footnotes and Papers, 1939).
4.
James L. Sandoe, "The Case of Maxwell Anderson," Colorado College Publication 30 ( April 1, 1940): 73-82. Sandoe, at the time librarian at the University of Colorado, had participated in Prof. Bailey's drama workshops at Stanford during the summers of 1935 and 1936, and with the invitation to the 1938 awards ceremony Prof. Bailey had included Sandoe's paper.

61. TO GUTHRIE MC CLINTIC 1

New City
March 5, 1938

Dear Guthrie:

Within a day or two you will probably see an announcement of a producing organization formed by a number of playwrights of whom I am one. The idea is similar to that of the project which came to nothing several years ago, though the playwrights involved are not all the same. 2 The formation of this organization will naturally have some bearing on our understanding, but I hasten to assure you that

-68-

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