Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

of the Playwrights' Company agree that you will have first chance at any play we write which seems to have a part for you.

Good luck and good fortune to you both.

As ever,
Max

1.
Muni's wife, the actress Bella Finkel. She sometimes appeared in plays with him but had no role in key Largo.

91. TO DOROTHY THOMPSON 1

New City
September 8, 1940

Dear Dorothy Thompson:

The Playwrights Company has tried several times to organize a repertory theatre but has always met with insuperable obstacles. It's our conviction that the theatre, to be healthy, should be able to pay for itself, also we have never felt financially able to support a repertory which could not stand on its own feet. But when we try to put such an organization together we always discover that the costs would outweigh the income--even at the most sanguine estimate. New York productions are geared to bring in an income over a considerable period of time. You can't possibly make back your production costs on a play in two weeks. It's seldom that you can do it in six weeks. A repertory company would have to begin with a rush of productions-- all of them gambles, as everything is in our theatre--and no likelihood of getting the investment back within several years, if at all. I don't know of anybody who could afford to sink money in such a venture-- and, frankly, I have my doubts of the soundness of any scheme that doesn't at least promise a return.

Perhaps your theory is that your actors will not cost as much, nor your productions, as is usual on Broadway. We've had some experience with that. We honestly try to hold down the cost of production to a minimum. But if you want an acceptable production, with actors the public will pay to see, you can't proceed inexpensively.

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.