Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

comes through. But I'm baffled, too--and just have to wait on the movements and decisions of people who don't move fast and may not all mean what they say. I won't stay here for a long period, though, unless you can come. And I've made that clear. Also--it's tempting here--they offer me so much--but I don't want to end up an expatriate. I'll have to be an American writer to the last.

But I'm doing all I can--and you'll hear. All my love, dear--

Max 10

1.
Another of the composite letters, written from the South Molton Street address in London, its entries dated May 6, May 7 (6:30 A.M. and 4:30 P.M.), and May 8 (7:30 A.M.)
2.
The Wingless Victory was produced by Bernard Delfort at the Phoenix Theatre in London, opening on September 8, 1943. Redgrave (b. 1908), British actor and director, directed the production. Wanda Rotha, international actress born in Vienna, had the lead (Oparre), supported by her husband, the British actor Manning Whiley (b. 1915). A Month in the Country, in which Redgrave was starring, was an adaption by Emlyn Williams of the Turgenev novel that had opened on February 11, 1943. And Rain, in which Rotha and Whiley had played, was the 1922 dramatization by John Colton and Clemence Randolph of Somerset Maugham story "Miss Thompson."
3.
Harvey D. Gibson ( 1882-1950), president of Manufacturers Trust Company of New York, had taken a leave of absence in 1942 to become American Red Cross Commissioner to Great Britain.
4.
For the new scene, see Appendix I, no. 3. Mrs. Anderson sent the scene to Victor Samrock , Business Manager of the Playwrights' Company (her cover letter, June 1, 1943, W), but apparently it was not inserted into the New York production of the play.
5.
Note added at top of page: "Perhaps Miss Grieser will send luggage for you, by boat."
6.
Eleven Verse Plays.
7.
Nancy, wife of Anderson's son Alan, who was in the army in California at the time. Lawrence (Lillian was Lawrence's wife), Anderson's youngest brother. Quentin, Anderson's son; and Meg (Margaret), Quentin's wife.
8.
On May 7 the U.S. II Corps and Eighth Army compelled the surrender of the Germans at the North African city of Bizerta and the British First Army captured Tunis. The Allied army under the British Gen. Alexander moving from the west and the British army under Gen. Montgomery moving from the east had crushed the German army under Field Marshall Rommel, and the capture of Bizerta and Tunis signaled the end of German resistance to the Allies in North Africa.
9.
Burgess Meredith (b. 1907), Anderson's neighbor in Rockland County and actor (lead in Winterset, High Tor, The Star-Wagon), had entered the army earlier in 1943 (until 1945) and by July was stationed in London.
10.
Note added at top of page: "Later: Gabriel says he thinks it better to ask for you first and then mention Hesper--we may do that. He still thinks Rank is able to arrange the whole matter. So what I hope is a good voyage for such precious freight. Max"

-152-

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