Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
Save to active project

company I don't know. If it's better to leave my name on the books, I shall of course have no objection. If complete inactivity makes me an embarrassment to the organization I'll withdraw. I'd rather not take any part in producing plays from now on.

Max

1.
Barefoot in Athens had opened on October 31, 1951, and was to close on November 24 after a run of thirty performances, losing $70,000.

179. TO ROBERT E. SHERWOOD

[ New City] November 29, 1951

Dear Bob-- 1

Your letter is so generous, as you always are, that I'm tempted to say all right, I'll go right to work on another, just for the pleasure of working with people I like so much. Anyway this is no time for me to make irrevocable decisions, and I guess I haven't made any. Inactivity, as you point out, is not always cause for dropping out of the Playwrights' Company--though you omit to say that you singlehanded kept us on the credit side of the ledger for a good many years.

But I fear my problem will last longer than my present depression. It isn't only that I think the gamble isn't good enough for the investors when they put up the money for one by me. It's that the kind of theatre I have always written my plays for is gone or going. I have no hope that it will be resuscitated. Maybe, as you suggest, we'll discover other outlets for our work--outside New York, that is--but it begins to seem to me that what's wanted in New York is quick flash stuff, with plenty of shock or sex, and vapid musicals. That sort of thing was always wanted, of course, but it wasn't honored the way it is now. And there was occasionally room for something else.

It's true that I shall have to find a way to make a living outside the legitimate theatre, and some ways have begun to open up, so I shall sometimes be absent from Playwrights' meetings. I hope it's true that I'll always be welcome when I can attend. 2

Yours,

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.