Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

playwrights are not naturally fitted to be producers, the Playwrights' Company was not a good idea from the beginning. However we did put on some good plays and we had a lot of fun together. If play production should go back into business hands, and I think probably it should, then the playwrights who are now in the Playwrights' Co. should be free once again to go looking for new sponsors for each new play.

Personally, I don't feel responsible for the acts of the company, and feel that I'd rather my name were not on its flag. Perhaps the only way to remove it is to resign. I'll miss having a home office, and miss my friends here, but I can't afford to let things ride the way they are. It's misleading to the public and it's costly to me. I'm trying to pay off an old income tax debt, and what I invested in our original company would help if somebody wants to buy my stock.

Maxwell Anderson

1.
Anderson had had the experience with two recent plays, Devil's Hornpipe in 1953 and Richard and Anne in 1955. For Richard and Anne, unproduced and unpublished, see Catalogue, pp. 75-76.

201. TO JOHN F. WHARTON

141 Downes Avenue
Stamford, Connecticut
April 18, 1956

Dear John-- 1

After thinking it over I would like to put my Playwrights' Co. stock in Gilda's name. If there are papers to be prepared could you do that for me?

And thanks again for the explanations.

Yours Max

1.
The day before the present letter Anderson had lunched with Wharton to discuss his resignation from the Playwrights' Company (see no. 200). Wharton had urged Anderson not to resign, emphasizing the long-run financial advantages of remaining

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