Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
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1.
Rice had revised Ordeal By Fire, which in an earlier draft Anderson had liked (see no. 196).
2.
Rice did not produce or publish the play.

203. TO ENID BAGNOLD 1

141 Downes Avenue Stamford, Connecticut April 27, 1956

Dear Miss Bagnold--

Douglas Moore forwarded a copy of your letter (to him) to me, and I take pleasure in answering your question "Is it allowed to know?"

I don't know whether or not it's allowed, but my wife and I had such an enchanted time at "The Chalk Garden" that we couldn't think of any other candidate for the award. When MacLeish2 asked me to get together with Marc Connelly and Thornton Wilder to choose a candidate your name and the delightful dialogue of the play came to mind and nobody else was proposed.

It would be pleasant to meet you (your work I've known as long as it's been known over here) but I understand your feeling about flying. Instead of making a chore out of it, please take the time to dream out another play, and put it on here. You're good for us.

Sincerely Maxwell Anderson

1.
Miss Bagnold (b. 1889), English novelist ( Serena Blandish, 1924, adapted for the stage by S. N. Behrman, 1929; National Velvet, 1935) and playwright, was currently represented on Broadway by her play The Chalk Garden, which had opened for a long run on October 26, 1955. For the play she was to receive an Award of Merit from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and concerning the award and whether she needed to attend the ceremony she had written to Douglas Moore, composer, professor at Columbia, and member of the academy. Moore forwarded the letter to Anderson, who had been on the committee that selected Miss Bagnold's play for the award.
2.
Archibald MacLeish, at the time president of the academy ( 1953-56).

-281-

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