Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview
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Molly's play is a clever and smoothly written go at a topical subject which would have been timely in the year when Gadge recanted publicly and named names. It might even have drawn an audience then. Today I think it doesn't have a chance--though I agree with the attitude--or did at the time when it was pertinent to the discussion. We've moved enough since then so that the temper of the argument has cooled and, according to Brownell, 3 the reds are (within the U.S.A.) dwindling and less confident. 4

Yours Max

1.
Samrock had sent Anderson two plays to consider for production by the Playwrights' Company. The Sin of Pat Muldoon, which Anderson compares to a Sean O'Casey play, was by John McLiam (b. 1920), Canadian actor and playwright (who began his acting career in a production of Winterset in San Francisco in 1946).
2.
The Sin of Pat Muldoon, McLiam's only play, was not produced by the Playwrights' Company, but Richard Adler and Roger Stevens produced it in March, 1957. The second play, The Egghead by Molly Kazan ( 1906-63), was suggested by the appearance of her husband Elia Kazan (Gadge) before the House Committee on Un- American Activities in 1952, when he told of belonging to the Communist party in the mid-thirties and identified other members.
3.
Herbert Brownell, U.S. attorney general ( 1953-57).
4.
The Egghead was not produced by the Playwrights' Company, but Hope Abelson produced it in October, 1957.

207. TO THE EDITOR, New York Times

[ Stamford, Connecticut] October 19, 1956

Dear Sir, 1

It can't matter very much to anybody that I'm not supporting Bill Mauldin for Congress, but since your New City correspondent took the trouble to say, in your October 18th issue, that I was among Mauldin's New City boosters, perhaps you won't mind printing my statement that I am not. In fact, I have seldom agreed with Bill in political matters, and back in 1952 when he was highly vocal on one side of South Mountain Road in his support of Adlai Stevenson I was just as definitely for Gen. Eisenhower, though perhaps not so voluble,

-284-

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Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958
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