Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

on the other. I shall vote for Eisenhower again, and continue generally Republican. Moreover, I couldn't vote for Bill, even if I wanted to change parties, for I no longer live in Rockland County, and my vote will be cast in Connecticut. Bill, of course, knows this, though Emma Harrison (your correspondent) did not. I hope she was better informed in other details of her story. 2

Yours, Maxwell Anderson

1.
In 1956 Bill Mauldin, World War II cartoonist ( Up Front, 1945), ran unsuccessfully as the Democratic candidate for Congress in New York's 28th Congressional District, which included New City, and New York Times correspondent Emma Harrison reported on the race in an article that listed Anderson among Mauldin's New City supporters ( "Mrs. St. George and Bill Mauldin Offer Contrast in 28th," New York Times, October 18, 1956, p. 26, cols. 1-2).
2.
The Times acknowledged its error, October 23, 1956, p. 22, col. 5.

208. TO JOHN F. WHARTON

141 Downes Avenue Stamford, Connecticut April 21, 1957

Dear John-- 1

Congratulations on your new partner. And thanks sincerely for your letter which helps me make up my mind about the play. What I was trying to do was to telescope the beginnings of the Roman Empire into a mystery-history, but it was evidently an impossible task, for it doesn't sell itself any way, any where, and probably should be used as fill in some thruway project.

I'm thinking of another one now--they're fun to write whether or not they go on. 2

Yours Max

1.
Members of the Playwrights' Company had read The Golden Six, which focuses on the Roman Emperor Claudius ( 19 B.C.--A.D. 54). Wharton, remembering earlier plagiarism suits, had asked whether the play was indebted to Robert Graves's historical

-285-

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