Dramatist in America: Letters of Maxwell Anderson, 1912-1958

By Laurence G. Avery; Maxwell Anderson | Go to book overview

from you. I have a high regard for your brain and your method of work and your intuition.

And, as you know, the best reward of all is a word of praise from a contemporary you respect. I don't know whether that essay is good at all. It's my custom never to look back--it might lead to regret or gloating-equally to be avoided. But if you liked it that much it was worth doing--and you put me in good spirits and a working mood. Thank you, Paul, and all good fortune to you! 3

Max

1.
Green had told Anderson that he had just reread "The Essence of Tragedy" and found it an inspiration. He called it one of the best discussions of the nature of tragedy since Schiller and Goethe, and said he hoped Anderson would go back to the essay and expand it ( Green to Anderson, August 4, 1958; T).
2.
Madonna and Child, which Anderson had written in 1956 and put aside.
3.
Madonna and Child, which Anderson was revising at his death, has not been produced or published. For the play see Catalogue, pp. 71-73; and Laurence G. Avery, "Maxwell Anderson: A Changing Attitude Toward Love," Modern Drama 10 ( December 1967): 241-48.

212. TO THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA 1

141 Downes Avenue Stamford, Connecticut November 3, 1958

Dear UND:

You are celebrating your seventy-fifth anniversary this year--and that reminds me of something. I entered the University of North Dakota in the fall of 1908. It's just fifty years (plus a month or two) since I first walked among the little cluster of buildings on the prairie which was then the UND. This is not important to anybody but myself, but I shall celebrate it because it's now a half a century since I was first exposed to higher education on that bare and wind-swept campus at the end of a trolley line.

The buildings were brick and most of them new. The trees, save for a few along the coulee, were saplings, too slender to cast a shade or

-288-

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