Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill

By Harry W. Pfanz | Go to book overview

2
THE ONLY POSITION

On the evening of 30 June, Maj. Gen. John F. Reynolds and Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard met in the back room of Moritz Tavern, a brick house beside the Emmitsburg Road about seven miles south of Gettysburg and a mile north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Reynolds, a Pennsylvanian and commander of the First Corps, Army of the Potomac, had been designated that day as temporary commander of the army's left wing, the three corps nearest the known locations of the enemy. His own First Corps, now under the temporary command of Maj. Gen. Abner Doubleday, commander of its Third Division, was bivouacked along the road near Marsh Creek. Howard's Eleventh Corps was at Emmitsburg, Maryland, and Maj. Gen. Daniel E. Sickles's Third Corps had moved that day from Taneytown, Maryland, to Bridgeport, a hamlet on the Monocacy River about four miles east of Emmitsburg. 1

Schurz's division of the Eleventh Corps camped at Emmitsburg on the grounds of St. Joseph's College, a Roman Catholic school for girls. Schurz had persuaded the school's mother superior to lend him the use of one of the "nunnery's" buildings for his headquarters staff, suggesting that it would be protected better by having the headquarters party in it than it would be by having sentries posted outside. The good lady was cordial-- what choice did she have--and she turned Schurz over to her chaplain, who played the gracious host and conducted some of the headquarters staff on a tour of the school. So far did hospitality extend that the sisters served dinner to Schurz and his staff, and one officer was permitted to give an impromptu recital on the school's organ. 2

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - The Generals and Their Armies 1
  • 2 - The Only Position 15
  • 3 - Ewell and Howard Collide 31
  • 4 - Retreat to Cemetery Hill 45
  • 5 - The Rebels Take the Town 59
  • 6 - Ewell Hesitates 71
  • 7 - Slocum and Hancock Reach the Field 88
  • 8 - Getting Ready for the Fight 106
  • 9 - Skirmishers, Sharpshooters, and Civilians 129
  • 10 - Brinkerhoff's Ridge 153
  • 11 - The Artillery, 2 July 168
  • 12 - Blunder on the Right 190
  • 13 - Johnson Attacks! 205
  • 14 - Early Attacks Cemetery Hill 235
  • 15 - Cemetery Hill- the Repulse 263
  • 16 - Culp's Hill- Johnson's Assault, 3 July 284
  • 17 - The Last Attacks 310
  • 18 - Counterattacks near Spangler's Spring 328
  • 19 - 3 July, Mostly Afternoon 353
  • 20 - Epilogue 365
  • Appendix A - Spangler's Spring 377
  • Appendix B - Two Controversies 379
  • Appendix C - Order of Battle: Army of the Potomac and Army of Northern Virginia, 1-3 July 1863 383
  • Notes 407
  • Bibliography 471
  • Index 489
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 510

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.