Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill

By Harry W. Pfanz | Go to book overview

17
THE LAST ATTACKS

It was mid-morning. Maj. Gen. Edward Johnson had sent his brigades forward twice in an effort to seize Culp's Hill, and they had been repulsed. Now, perhaps at Ewell's suggestion, he ordered a third attack. This time Walker's Stonewall Brigade and the brigades of Steuart and Daniel would make the push. 1

Steuart's brigade would attack from the lower hill. The 3d North Carolina on the brigade right had been facing the draw leading up to the saddle between the hills and, having little cover, had suffered terribly during the evening's and early morning's battles. Now only a small portion of it was able to continue the fight. Like the 3d North Carolina, the right companies of the 1st Maryland Battalion had also been outside of the works and facing the deadly draw, but its left companies had been at the breastworks at the top of the lower hill. The remainder of the brigade stretched to the left behind the stone wall that led to the position of the 1st North Carolina Regiment beside the meadow east of Spangler's Spring. In forming for Johnson's attack, the right of the brigade would shift left so that the 3d North Carolina would be between the breastworks and the stone wall south of the crest of the lower hill. The brigade would wheel right from the stone wall and into the woods and would form on the left of the 3d North Carolina facing the open field. 2

The brigade commander, Brig. Gen. George Hume Steuart, was one of the few Maryland generals in the Confederate army. He was born in Baltimore on 24 August 1828 and graduated from West Point in 1848 near the bottom of his class. He had been a classmate of the Union cavalry general, John Buford. Steuart missed service in the war with Mexico but

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Gettysburg--Culp's Hill and Cemetery Hill
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - The Generals and Their Armies 1
  • 2 - The Only Position 15
  • 3 - Ewell and Howard Collide 31
  • 4 - Retreat to Cemetery Hill 45
  • 5 - The Rebels Take the Town 59
  • 6 - Ewell Hesitates 71
  • 7 - Slocum and Hancock Reach the Field 88
  • 8 - Getting Ready for the Fight 106
  • 9 - Skirmishers, Sharpshooters, and Civilians 129
  • 10 - Brinkerhoff's Ridge 153
  • 11 - The Artillery, 2 July 168
  • 12 - Blunder on the Right 190
  • 13 - Johnson Attacks! 205
  • 14 - Early Attacks Cemetery Hill 235
  • 15 - Cemetery Hill- the Repulse 263
  • 16 - Culp's Hill- Johnson's Assault, 3 July 284
  • 17 - The Last Attacks 310
  • 18 - Counterattacks near Spangler's Spring 328
  • 19 - 3 July, Mostly Afternoon 353
  • 20 - Epilogue 365
  • Appendix A - Spangler's Spring 377
  • Appendix B - Two Controversies 379
  • Appendix C - Order of Battle: Army of the Potomac and Army of Northern Virginia, 1-3 July 1863 383
  • Notes 407
  • Bibliography 471
  • Index 489
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