Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections

By Neil Fraistat | Go to book overview

and that his talent can be displayed in a kind of poetry he had previously left untried. The appearance of Eloisa to Abelard in the same volume with Sapho to Phaon, like his earlier coupling of the Pastorals and Messiah, invites the reader to measure Pope against his Classical model. Eloisa to Abelard treats anew the "best of passions, Love and Fame" (419; 40), apparently in conflict in a poem whose very existence preserves them both, and in so doing fulfills Eloisa's prophecy of "some future Bard":

Such if there be, who loves so long, so well;
Let him our sad, our tender story tell;
The well-sung woes shall sooth my pensive ghost;
He best can paint 'em, who shall feel 'em most.

(435, 363-66)

The poetic monument Pope constructs to "graft [Eloisa's] love immortal on [ Abelard's] fame" (434; 344) becomes the last piece of his Works of 1717, his own Temple of Fame, "a work outlasting monumental brass." 39


NOTES
1.
Reprinted in 1935 as Pope's Own Miscellany, ed. Norman Ault ( London: The Nonesuch Press).
2.
For the various folio and quarto versions of the Works, see Reginald Harvey Griffith , Alexander Pope: A Bibliography ( Austin: University of Texas Press, 1922), 1: 65-70, items 79-86. The quarto I cite throughout is item 79, Huntington shelf number 143018.
3.
Lives of the English Poets By Samuel Johnson, ed. George Birkbeck Hill ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1905), 3:200.
4.
The Correspondence of Alexander Pope, ed. George Sherburn ( Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1956), 1:396. Hereafter cited parenthetically in the text.
5.
Maynard Mack, "Pope's 1717 Preface with a Transcription of the Manuscript Text," in Collected in Himself: Essays Critical, Biographical, and Bibliographical on Pope and Some of His Contemporaries ( Newark: University of Delaware Press, 1982), p. 166; Dustin Griffin , Alexander Pope: The Poet in the Poems ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1978), p. 92.
6.
Mack, "Pope's 1717 Preface," p. 161; Griffin, Alexander Pope, p. 92.
7.
Poems on Several Occasions may have been intended as an indirect advertisement for the Works: many of the poems in the miscellany praise Pope and his poems.
8.
David Foxon, Pope and the Early Eighteenth-Century Book Trade (forthcoming), p. 78 of typescript on deposit at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library.
9.
Foxon, Pope, p. 89. Pope and Gribelin had collaborated in 1716 in the second

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.