Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections

By Neil Fraistat | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
John Forster review appeared in The Examiner for 26 November 1842 and is conveniently reprinted in Browning: The Critical Heritage, ed. Boyd Litzinger and Donald Smalley ( New York: Barnes and Noble, 1970), pp. 82-84. The remark cited is on page 83.
2.
William E. Harrold The Variance and the Unity: A Study of the Complementary Poems of Robert Browning ( Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1973), the most detailed study to date, briefly discusses four of the groupings from Dramatic Lyrics but concentrates on later poems. Harrold's commitment to Gestalt and Jungian psychology, his focus on pairs rather than volumes, and some of his individual readings (e.g., of Porphyria's lover as a Neoplatonist) lead him to conclusions quite different from mine. Nancy B. Rich has some comments on "Madhouse Cells" in the course of her "New Perspective on the Companion Poems of Robert Browning," Victorian Newsletter 36 ( 1969): 5-9. Lawrence Poston III, in "Browning Rearranges Browning," Studies in Browning and His Circle 2 ( 1974): 39-54, studies the 1863 rearrangement as "a kind of backward look" over Browning's career. Like Harrold, Poston denies an overall significance to the early volumes but does include helpful remarks on two pairings and two more individual poems. More recently, Daniel Karlin in "Browning's Paired Poems," Essays in Criticism 31 ( 1981): 210-27, deals with a few poems from 1845 onwards.
3.
On Dramatis Personae see Lawrence Poston III, Loss and Gain: An Essay on Browning's Dramatis Personae, University of Nebraska Studies No. 48 ( Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1974) and Thomas Wyly, "Unity and Design in Browning's Dramatis Personae," Revue des Langues Vivantes 43 ( 1977): 38-53.
4.
The pamphlet itself lacks a table of contents; I have simply listed the tides in the order in which they appear. Browning kept the same ordering but removed most of the titular pairings for the 1849 collected edition Dramatic Romances and Lyrics, which combined the 1842 Dramatic Lyrics with the 1845 Dramatic Romances and Lyrics. In 1863, he redistributed the poems from the first two volumes and Men and Women but confusingly kept the old titles as categories. Basic accounts of the later versions can be found in William Clyde DeVane, A Browning Handbook ( New York: Appleton-Century- Crofts, 1955), pp. 102-104, 150-53, and 205-208, in the text and notes to volumes 3 and 5 of The Complete Works of Robert Browning, ed. Roma A. King et al. ( Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 1969-), and in the notes to Robert Browning: The Poems, ed. John Pettigrew, supplemented and completed by Thomas J. Collins ( New Haven: Yale University Press, 1981), vol. 1. Quotations in the present article come from the Pettigrew-Collins volume because of its accessibility and reliability; most of the poems are short enough for quotations to be located readily, but I have supplied line numbers within parentheses in my text for citations from the few lengthy poems of the volume. For those few cases dealing with the original wording I have followed the Ohio Browning, giving volume and page numbers.
5.
See Mrs. Sutherland Orr, Life and Letters of Robert Browning, New Edition ( London: Smith, Elder & Co., 1908), p. 122.

-286-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poems in Their Place: The Intertextuality and Order of Poetic Collections
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 346

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.