In the Land of the Grasshopper Song: Two Women in the Klamath River Indian Country in 1908-09

By Mary Ellicott Arnold; Mabel Reed | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
Moving Day on the Klamath

At long last we are going to have a house at I-ees-i-rum. Dave McLaughlin is going to build it for us. He came in this morning to see us, ate a large breakfast, and said he would start work Monday. He promised that the house would be finished by November thirtieth.

It all started with a letter from Washington. It appears that our official star is in the ascendant. We learn that we are to be allowed the money for two stations, four hundred dollars for each of them. In addition, we are to have two hundred dollars for horses and about forty dollars for equipment.

In the same mail with the Washington letter was one from Mr. Kyselka. He wrote that he had heard from Washington that we were to have all the assistance we needed. But he really doesn't see what he can do. It is impossible for him to leave Hoopa at the present time. He has no secretary and is very much behind in his work. Moreover, he has been informed that he has been promoted to a school in South Carolina. And, oh dear, oh dear (our interpretation of his feelings), it is a dreadful thing to have to leave accounts to be paid by the next superintendent. Of course, we may do anything we think necessary, with his blessing (again our interpretation). Accounts like his really constitute hours of work. He hopes we enjoyed our vacation and he is faithfully ours.

Following hard upon Mr. Kyselka's letter, Mr. Hunter turned up. He sat thankfully on our porch and wiped his fore

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