Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration - Vol. 1

By Allan Nevins | Go to book overview

Chapter XIV The Battle of Santo Domingo

THE secret of the treaty for Dominican annexation was, as such state secrets go, extremely well kept. To be sure, during the last two months of 1869 the metropolitan newspapers indulged in a tremendous amount of conjecture. The New York Herald as early as November 17 printed a long story about the "probable annexation" of the republic, saying that in the next few weeks the question would be tangibly presented to Congress. The Philadelphia Press stated at the same time that a treaty of annexation had probably been made. Though other newspapers carried denials, hearsay reports and gossip about annexation persisted. Thornton wrote the British Government on November 291 that he thought the United States was taking steps, on the invitation of Baez, to acquire the republic. He had learned from the British chargé at Port au Prince that the Haitian Government was also proposing to the United States a defensive and offensive alliance, to contain a secret clause by which the Haitians would cede Mole St. Nicholas, valuable as a naval base, in return for an American loan. It was clear to him that if the Administration succeeded in effecting the annexation of Santo Domingo, all the rest of the island would soon fall into its hands. To this, it may be said, England had no real objection. Unquestionably many diplomatists, Congressmen, and journalists suspected that a bargain had been made.

Yet all the talk remained mere conjecture. After Babcock's second return from the island, his convention for a fifty-year lease of Samaná

____________________
1
PRO, FO 5, 1163; Thornton to Clarendon, November 29, 1869; No. 412 (Confidential). Thornton wrote: "But if the United States should succeed in bringing about the annexation of the Dominican Republic, it is probable that they would consent to a considerable sacrifice to obtain possession of the whole Island, especially as the Mole St. Nicholas is considered to be about as good as that of Samana, and less unhealthy. It is not to be supposed that in the present unhealthy state of Hayti, the chieftains who have command in its different sections would resist even moderate pecuniary temptations. If the United States were once in possession of the whole of that island, it would not probably be long before the separation from the mother country of the islands of Cuba and Puerto Rico would be effected, to be followed possibly by their annexation to the United States."

-309-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hamilton Fish: The Inner History of the Grant Administration - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Contents xix
  • Chapter I an Heir of the Federalists 1
  • Chapter II the Great Whig Battles 20
  • Chapter III the Senate in Stormy Days 36
  • Chapter IV Travel and War 66
  • Chapter V the Watcher 89
  • Chapter VI Grant in Power 105
  • Chapter VII Portrait of a President 124
  • Chapter VIII Broadside from Sumner 142
  • Chapter IX 176
  • Chapter X Motley's Insubordination 201
  • Chapter XII Pandora's Box 249
  • Chapter XIII Congress in Session 279
  • Chapter XIV the Battle of Santo Domingo 309
  • Chapter XV Crisis: June, 1870 335
  • Chapter XVI Exit Motley--And Sumner's Policy 372
  • Chapter XVII War in Europe 400
  • Chapter XVIII the Road to Peace 423
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.