Constitutions and Constitutional Trends since World War II: An Examination of Significant Aspects of Postwar Public Law with Particular Reference to the New Constitutions of Western Europe

By Arnold J. Zurcher | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THIS Book consists of a series of essays on the postwar constitutions written by eight of America's outstanding specialists in comparative public law. The essays are an outgrowth of papers that were prepared for a two-day round-table discussion group on the postwar constitutions at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association recently held in New York City. Subsequently the papers were entirely rewritten and greatly elaborated. Much new material was incorporated, and the various authors developed their respective topics more systematically and also more comprehensively than was possible in the forum which originally inspired their efforts. In order to enhance the reference value of the book, the texts of the more representative new constitutions and public documents have been incorporated in the Appendix. The result, although hardly a systematic legal or philosophic commentary on the new postwar documents, will nevertheless furnish the student with a satisfactory comparative introduction to such a commentary and provide him with significant interpretations and analyses of at least the more novel institutional aspects of the governmental and administrative patterns that have emerged since World War II.

All involved in this project owe a debt of gratitude to New York University Press for its entrepreneurship in undertaking production of this volume. Much of that debt is owed to the Secretary of the Press Committee on Management and Supervisor of Printing at New York University, Miss Jean B. Barr, for her careful editing of the manuscript and for planning and designing this book. Grateful acknowledgment is also made of the work of her colleague, Miss Anne Koreny. The French Embassy in the United States kindly permitted use of the official English translation of the French Constitution and provided the editor with copies. The English translation of the Italian Constitution is that provided by Messrs. Howard McGaw Smyth and Kent Roberts Greenfield and is reprinted from

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