Constitutions and Constitutional Trends since World War II: An Examination of Significant Aspects of Postwar Public Law with Particular Reference to the New Constitutions of Western Europe

By Arnold J. Zurcher | Go to book overview

11
Reflections on the Value of Constitutions in Our Revolutionary Age

By Karl Loewenstein AMHERST COLLEGE


The Ontological Approach

The epidemic of constitution-making in the wake of World War II has no parallel in history. Since 1945 some fifty-odd nations have equipped themselves with new constitutions.1 In some countries

____________________
1
The following enumeration is incomplete: Germany: two federal constitutions ( 1949), one each for the Western (Deutsche Bundesrepublik) and the Eastern part (Deutsche Demokratische Republik); each of the four Länder in the United States zone ( 1945-1946); three in the French zone (in addition to the Saar); five in the Soviet zone ( 1946-1947); two in the British zone (North-Rhine-Westphalia and Schleswig-Holstein ( 1950); those in Lower Saxony and Hamburg are in the process of completion. Berlin adopted two constitutions ( 1946 and 1948). France: two constitutions ( 1946); the first, of April 27, 1946, was rejected by referendum. Other new constitutions in Western Europe are: Italy ( 1947); Iceland ( 1944). In Eastern Europe new constitutions were adopted by the Soviet satellite states of Yugoslavia ( 1946); Albania ( 1946), which was reportedly supplanted by a new constitution in 1950; Bulgaria ( 1947); Czechoslovakia ( 1948); Rumania ( 1948); Hungary ( 1949); Poland confined itself to an adaptation of the older constitution of 1920. Latin America has had nine new constitutions since 1945: Bolivia ( 1945); Brazil ( 1946); Ecuador ( 1946); El Salvador 1945); Guatemala ( 1945); Haiti ( 1946); Nicaragua ( 1948); Panama ( 1946); Venezuela ( 1947). Among the new constitutions in Asia are: China ( 1946); Japan ( 1946); Siam ( Thailand) ( 1949); Korea (1948); whether Northern Korea had a constitution is not known. Others, in the British sphere of influence, are India ( 1949); Ceylon ( 1946); Burma ( 1948). In Pakistan and Indonesia, constitutions are under preparation. Israel, after a draft constitution ( 1948), operates on the basis of an interim or "little" constitution ( 1949). Transjordan adopted a constitution in 1946.

Reliable texts are not easily obtainable except in the case of Western Europe and Latin America; a good collection of the latter is edited by Russell H. Fitzgibbon, The Constitutions of Latin America ( Chicago, 1948). For the Arab world, see Helen Miller Davis, Constitutions, Electoral Laws, and Treaties of the States in the Near and Middle East ( Durham, N.C., 1947). The ambitious undertaking by Amos J. Peaslee , Constitutions of Nations ( Concord, N.H., 1950), to assemble in three volumes the constitutions of all states seems, at least to the author of this section, a complete and unmitigated failure. Translations are often far from accurate even if obtained from American embassies abroad. The factual data (in some cases even concerning the very date of the constitution) are shot through with crude errors; the introductions of the editor are often without understanding. Much of the tabulatory material is worthless. The bibliographies are neither up to date nor properly selective. Misspellings abound. It is regrettable that the author's efforts have resulted in so amateurish a compilation.

-191-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constitutions and Constitutional Trends since World War II: An Examination of Significant Aspects of Postwar Public Law with Particular Reference to the New Constitutions of Western Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.