The Challenges We Face: Edited and Compiled from the Speeches and Papers of Richard M. Nixon

By Richard M. Nixon | Go to book overview

4. Foreign Policy in Action: Latin America11

I said when I returned from Latin America in the spring of 1958 that we must not allow the unfortunate incidents that took place there to obscure the total picture of this trip. We must not allow mob action to obscure the real feeling of friendship and affection that the vast majority of the people of Latin America have for the people of the United States. There is no question in my mind that in the end the results of this trip will prove to be beneficial. But the trip will be remembered not in terms of what is said now, today, and not in terms of the stories that were written while it was going on -- its success or failure will be measured in terms of what is done and what happens in the relationships between the United States and Latin America in the months and years ahead.

If, as a result, some people who may not have recognized the tremendous importance of Latin America to the United States, now realize it-the trip will have been worthwhile. If, as a result, the Latin American story, not just the story of the revolution which usually gets on the front page, but the great constructive story of a continent which is on the way to economic progress and freedom, gets from page 8 onto page I in the nation's great newspapers-the trip will have been worthwhile. All of these things I think should be said.

____________________
11
The material in this section is derived from the following sources:

Remarks to the American Society of Newspaper Editors, Washington, D.C. April 18, 1959. Responses to questions at the California Newspaper Publishers Association Convention, Los Angeles, California. February 6, 1960. Remarks at MATS Terminal on the return of the Vice President from his South American tour, Washington, D.C. May 15, 1958. Responses to questions at the National Press Club, Washington, D.C. May 21, 1958.

-91-

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The Challenges We Face: Edited and Compiled from the Speeches and Papers of Richard M. Nixon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part One - America: Its Heritage and Mission 1
  • 1. the Pioneer Spirit 3
  • 2. Our Legacy from the Old World 11
  • Part Two - Coexistence and Survival 21
  • 1. the Soviet Challenge 23
  • 2. Khrushchev in America 36
  • Part Three - U.S. Foreign Policy: Peace with Freedom and Justice 47
  • 1. the Rule of Law 49
  • 2. Foreign Aid 61
  • 3. the Pursuit of Peace 81
  • 4. Foreign Policy in Action: Latin America 91
  • 5. Foreign Policy in Action: Africa 104
  • 6. Foreign Policy in Action: Lebanon 115
  • 7. Foreign Policy in Action: Communist China 122
  • Part Four - Democracy at Worke 129
  • 1. Politics and Leadership 131
  • 2. Strength for Peace and Freedom 141
  • 3. a Dynamic Economy for America 147
  • 4. the Challenge to American Education 160
  • 5. Labor and the Steel Strike 171
  • 6. Civil Rights 181
  • 7. Forgotten Peoples 188
  • Part Five - Mission to the Soviet Union 193
  • 1. Russia as I Saw It 195
  • 2. the "Kitchen Debate" 219
  • 3. America Accepts the Challenge 227
  • 4. a Talk to the Russian People 235
  • Mr. Nixon's Life in Brief 247
  • Index 249
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