The Challenges We Face: Edited and Compiled from the Speeches and Papers of Richard M. Nixon

By Richard M. Nixon | Go to book overview

2. The "Kitchen Debate"36

At the gate of the Exhibition, Mr. Khrushchev voiced a gibe about the United States ban on the shipment of strategic goods to the Soviet Union.

Khrushchev: "Americans have lost their ability to trade. Now you have grown older and you don't trade the way you used to. You need to be invigorated."

Nixon: "You need to have goods to trade."

The statesmen went on to look at television and video tape equipment for playing back recordings. Mr. Nixon took a cue from it.

Nixon: "There must be a free exchange of ideas."

Mr. Khrushchev responded with a remark touching on the reporting of his speeches on his recent Polish tour.

Mr. Nixon said he was certain that Mr. Khrushchev's speeches and those of Frol R. Kozlov, First Deputy Premier, had been fully reported in the West.

Khrushchev (indicating cameras recording the scene on video tape): "Then what about this tape?" (Smiling.) "If it is shown in the United States it will be shown in English and I would like a guarantee that there will be a full translation of my remarks."

Mr. Nixon said there would be an English translation of Mr. Khrushchev's remarks and added his hope that all his own remarks in the Soviet Union would be given with full translations in that country.

____________________
36
The material in this section is derived from an account of the informal exchanges in Moscow on July 24, 1959, between Vice President Richard Nixon and Premier Nikita S. Khrushchev, compiled from dispatches of The New York Times, the Associated Press, United Press International, and Reuters.

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The Challenges We Face: Edited and Compiled from the Speeches and Papers of Richard M. Nixon
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publisher's Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part One - America: Its Heritage and Mission 1
  • 1. the Pioneer Spirit 3
  • 2. Our Legacy from the Old World 11
  • Part Two - Coexistence and Survival 21
  • 1. the Soviet Challenge 23
  • 2. Khrushchev in America 36
  • Part Three - U.S. Foreign Policy: Peace with Freedom and Justice 47
  • 1. the Rule of Law 49
  • 2. Foreign Aid 61
  • 3. the Pursuit of Peace 81
  • 4. Foreign Policy in Action: Latin America 91
  • 5. Foreign Policy in Action: Africa 104
  • 6. Foreign Policy in Action: Lebanon 115
  • 7. Foreign Policy in Action: Communist China 122
  • Part Four - Democracy at Worke 129
  • 1. Politics and Leadership 131
  • 2. Strength for Peace and Freedom 141
  • 3. a Dynamic Economy for America 147
  • 4. the Challenge to American Education 160
  • 5. Labor and the Steel Strike 171
  • 6. Civil Rights 181
  • 7. Forgotten Peoples 188
  • Part Five - Mission to the Soviet Union 193
  • 1. Russia as I Saw It 195
  • 2. the "Kitchen Debate" 219
  • 3. America Accepts the Challenge 227
  • 4. a Talk to the Russian People 235
  • Mr. Nixon's Life in Brief 247
  • Index 249
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