The Theories of Instinct: A Study in the History of Psychology

By E. C. Wilm | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER II
The Systematic Period Atomism, Plato and Aristotle. The Peripatetic School: Strato and Theophrastus

IN the writers discussed hitherto the distinction between the bodily and the mental becomes gradually more explicit as we pass from the earliest hylozoistic systems, where the material and the living are indistinguishably merged, to the systems of Empedocles and Anaxagoras, in which physical and non-physical principles begin to be separated as two fundamentally different categories, both, however, being recognized as true explanatory principles. In the system of Leucippus and Democritus philosophy enters upon a critical and controversial phase; the dualism heretofore merely implicit comes to conscious recognition, and is subjected to a methodical criticism. The dualistic interpretation is meanwhile continued and greatly elaborated in the systems of Plato and Aristotle, in whom a world-view wholly different from the materialistic atomism of Democritus, a worldview destined to mould subsequent philosophy in an unprecedented manner, begins to take definite shape.


I

Leucippus, of doubtful date and antecedents, and Democritus of Abdera in Thrace (c. 460-370), recognize only two principles of things, the "full" and the "void," being and non-being (ὂν and μὴ ὂν). The

-12-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Theories of Instinct: A Study in the History of Psychology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?