CHAPTER 24
MORE FOOD AND BETTER GUARANTEES

Notwithstanding the assaults of the militarists, we were not neglectful of our obligations to ten million very hungry people. Taking advantage of the promised support from the Allied Foreign Offices, we asked for increased import permits and more subsidies.

There had been no reason for the British and French Foreign Offices' reduction of food supplies at the end of February, 1916. There was, at this time, abundant overseas food available in the world. The action taken by the British and French certainly did not frighten the Germans. Indeed, it gave them the opportunity to charge the British and French with starving the Belgians and Northern French.

As I said in the last chapter, I personally went to Belgium to make a re-estimate of the situation on the spot and to give as fresh a report as possible to the Foreign Offices. With the reduced food supply, the Belgians' daily regimen was as follows:

Total grams per diem 394.0
Total protein 49.1
Total fats 39.5
Total carbohydrates 256.1
Total calorific value 1,552.0

The total of 1,552 calories per person per them was about 50 per cent below the normal consumption of the Belgians and about 50 per cent below what was being consumed by the British at the time.

-215-

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