CHAPTER 36
WE SET UP SPANISH AND DUTCH REPRESENTATIVES IN BELGIUM AND NORTHERN FRANCE
I arrived in London on April 3, 1917. The attack by the German submarines on American ships had made our entry into the war inevitable. On April 2, President Wilson made his eloquent address to Congress requesting a declaration of war. At once our American staff began to come out of the occupied territory. Pending arrangements for neutrals to represent the Commission inside Belgium, I requested the Spanish Minister in Brussels to arrange for certain members of our staff to remain, particularly Prentiss Gray, who was now our Director in Brussels, until the Spanish and Dutch could take over.Setting up neutral representation to take over the protection in Belgium and the North of France proved troublesome and long drawn out. There were international jealousies which I cannot attempt to explain. Chevrillon, as early as March 12, reported that the French Government insisted that the Swiss should take over in the North of France and the Dutch in Belgium. They did not want the Spanish.On March 22, our London office received a copy of the British proposal to the French on the future organization of the Commission. They favored a Dutch staff in both Belgium and Northern France. FOREIGN OFFICE, LONDON 22 March 1917 MINISTRY OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS, PARIS
1. His Majesty's Government understand that the French Government would be glad to have a brief explanation of their precise view on the sub

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