A Treasury of Jewish Letters: Letters from the Famous and the Humble - Vol. 1

By Franz Kobler | Go to book overview

PART ONE

I
King Hezekiah invites the Children of Israel to a Solemn Passover Jerusalem

SAMARIA had fallen. The northern Kingdom of Israel, with its own sanctuaries harbouring images of the Golden Calf in Dan and Bethel, had been overthrown by the Assyrians, and the country largely depopulated and annexed. But Jerusalem still stood. There the young king Hezekiah reigned ( 720-692 B.C.E.) and aspired to elevate the Kingdom of Judah to a newborn glory. Zealously devoted to the service of the God of Israel, he ordered the removal of the idolatrous altars in the mountains and groves, erected under Ahaz his father, and made a great effort to regain for Solomon's Temple, which the northern kingdom had abandoned ever since the days of Jeroboam centuries before, its position as the one and only sanctuary in all Israel.

The King, according to the account in 2 Chronicles XXX, after cleansing and rededicating the Temple, proclaimed a solemn Passover. He sent a circular letter to the Children of Israel, both in Judah and beyond its frontiers, inviting the people to come to Jerusalem to keep the feast. 'So the posts went with the letters from the hand of the King and his princes throughout all Israel and Judah, and according to the commandments of the King, saying:


HEZEKIAH, KING OF JUDAH, TO THE CHILDREN OF ISRAEL

'Yield yourselves unto the Lord, and enter into His sanctuary, which He has sanctified for ever'

[ Jerusalem, end of the 8th century B.C.E. ]

Ye Children of Israel, turn back unto the Lord, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Israel, that He may return to the remnant that are escaped of you out of the kings of Assyria. And be not ye like your fathers, and like your brethren, who acted treacherously

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Treasury of Jewish Letters: Letters from the Famous and the Humble - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.