A Catholic Runs for President: The Campaign of 1928

By Edmund A. Moore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
An Unwritten Law

"No Governor can kiss the papal ring and get within gunshot of the White House..."1

-- Bishop Adna W. Leonard

The year 1918, when President Wilson suffered his first political defeat, marked Smith's first election as Governor of New York. It was clear that the War for Democracy had not ushered in the millenium; the Era of Progressivism, however, did not everywhere end so abruptly as the apostles of normalcy had hoped. The task of adjusting legal codes to serve the ends of social justice in an industrial society, still mainly one for the states, remained urgent. At the moment when frustration and futility were triumphant in Washington, Governor Smith carried through humanitarian and administrative reforms in the Empire State and held ascendancy over both political parties. A master of practical political science without benefit of academic degrees, he had the uncommon ability to make "the record" plain to ordinary people. He was to be five times a candidate

-21-

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A Catholic Runs for President: The Campaign of 1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Chapter One - The Anti-Catholic Heritage, to World War I 1
  • Chapter Two - An Unwritten Law 21
  • Chapter Three - The Marshall-Smith Exchange 57
  • Chapter Four - Enter Tom Heflin and Tom Walsh 81
  • Chapter Five - A Campaign Within a Campaign 107
  • Chapter Six - Anti-Catholicism at Flood Stage 145
  • Conclusion 195
  • References 201
  • Bibliographical Note 209
  • Index 213
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