A Catholic Runs for President: The Campaign of 1928

By Edmund A. Moore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX Anti-Catholicism at Flood Stage

...the relations between Catholics and Protestants in this country are a scandal and an offense against Christian charity.1

-- Reinhold Niebuhr

"...Watch the trains!" The Pope may arrive in person, perhaps on the "north-bound train tomorrow!" So cried a Klansman to a crowd at North Manchester, Indiana.2 The next day's "north-bound" was met by "some fifteen hundred persons." One hapless passenger looking rather like a cleric had great difficulty in persuading the assembled multitude that he was not in fact the Pope. It is not important whether the details of this episode can be verified. There is no reason to impeach its narrator's conclusion that prejudices which made such Klan appeals politically profitable were "rampant in fully a tenth of Indiana's white, Gentile, Protestant native-born people."3 Though the Klan's political hold on Indiana was exceeded nowhere, Hoosiers were not altogether different from other Americans.4

Some varieties of anti-Catholicism were less direct. A single word or phrase embodying emotionally charged

-145-

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A Catholic Runs for President: The Campaign of 1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Chapter One - The Anti-Catholic Heritage, to World War I 1
  • Chapter Two - An Unwritten Law 21
  • Chapter Three - The Marshall-Smith Exchange 57
  • Chapter Four - Enter Tom Heflin and Tom Walsh 81
  • Chapter Five - A Campaign Within a Campaign 107
  • Chapter Six - Anti-Catholicism at Flood Stage 145
  • Conclusion 195
  • References 201
  • Bibliographical Note 209
  • Index 213
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