The United States and Inter-American Security, 1889-1960

By J. Lloyd Mecham | Go to book overview

V The Good Neighbor (1929-1939)

The faith of the Americas lies in the spirit. The system, the sisterhood, of the Americas is impregnable so long as her nations maintain that spirit.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, 1936

T HE DECADE FOLLOWING the Havana and Washington conferences, and particularly after 1933, was marked by the most significant developments in the history of the Pan American movement up to that time. Not only were extremely important agreements adopted providing for innovations in the procedures of peaceful settlement and the extension of security to include overseas threats, but, equally important, the psychological bases of inter-American cooperation were greatly strengthened) Long-standing fears, suspicions, and distrust of the motives of the dominant member of the inter-American system had obscured the view of the twenty other members concerning the true mutuality of continental interests. Because of the United States' interventionism and imperialism it was really expecting too much of weak and backward states, excessively sensitive of their national sovereignties, to subscribe to the security principle "all for one, one for all." Yet, this became a reality by the end of the decade after the atmosphere had been cleared by the enunciation of the Good Neighbor policy, the essence of which was United States recognition, by word and action, of the sovereignty and territorial integrity of the Western Hemisphere nations. Then the American states, for the first time, were able to see their mutual interests clearly.)

Enanciation of the policy of the Good Neighbor. The debates at Havana in 1928 had made it more apparent than ever that the incompatibilities latent in United States--Latin-American relations could never be resolved except by a reorientation of policy. This being the case, that conference served the dual purpose of reinforcing a conviction and stimulating a decision. The United States had become convinced that it was no longer necessary to premise its Latin-American

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The United States and Inter-American Security, 1889-1960
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 516

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.