Madison Catalogue of 2786 Stars for the Epoch 1910 from Meridian Observations

By Albert S. Flint | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The present work is the outcome of an arrangement made in about the year 1912 between George C. Comstock and Lewis Boss. In outlining a program of observation for the meridian circle of the Washburn Observatory, to be undertaken by Albert S. Flint, it was agreed that the most useful work would be the assumption of part of the Albany program for the proposed Boss Catalogue. Accordingly, the programs at Albany and Madison were prepared on a cooperative basis. The observations at Madison extended from 1912 to 1919, and the reductions were well advanced at the time of Mr. Flint's retirement in 1920. He died in 1923. Shortly before the undersigned succeeded Comstock at Madison in 1922, the whole accumulated material of observations and reductions was shipped to Albany, on agreement with Benjamin Boss that he could make such use of it as he saw feasible in the preparation of the General Catalogue.

The material was assigned to Arthur J. Roy, who with assistants made some progress up to the time of the final decision on the inclusion of general observations in the General Catalogue. It was then estimated that the inclusion of Flint's work would delay the appearance of the General Catalogue by more than a year, so it seemed best to let Flint's stars appear in a later catalogue. Through the good offices of President John C. Merriam, the Carnegie Institution agreed to have Mr. Roy finish the project as a post-retirement investigation. Beginning in February 1936, Mr. Roy has worked at Albany unassisted, but some of the routine computations have been made by students at the Washburn Observatory under the supervision of C. M. Huffer and myself.

The completed catalogue is naturally considered as the joint work of Albert S. Flint and Arthur J. Roy.

JOEL STEBBINS

-iii-

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