Horace Greeley: Founder of the New York Tribune

By Don C. Seitz | Go to book overview

CHATER XIV
INCONSISTENT INDEPENDENCE

SYMPATHY for the underdog did not extend with Greeley to the much harassed President Andrew Johnson, quite probably because Johnson retained William H. Seward as secretary of state and presumably as intimate adviser. The Secretary had been severely wounded by Lewis Powell, alias Payne, one of Booth's band of assassins, and was never again his old aggressive self.

Perhaps it was Seward's sly desire to placate Greeley that caused President Johnson to nominate the editor as minister to Austria in July, 1867, to replace John Lothrop Motley, who had resigned. Senator Thomas W. Tipton, of Nebraska, a state for which Greeley had done so much, objected to consideration of the nomination and it was tabled, under the rules, never to be brought up again, the Senate adjourning immediately afterward.

When it came time to select a successor to Johnson the Democrats rallied in the new Tammany Hall in New York, built by William M. Tweed, on Fourteenth Street near Third Avenue, and with much flourish on the Fourth of July, 1868, nominated. Horatio Seymour and Frank P. Blair. Seymour had been twice governor of New York, and was much esteemed. Blair had been an active war Democrat. The Republican party

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Horace Greeley: Founder of the New York Tribune
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter I - The Man 1
  • Chapter II - Apprenticeship 29
  • Chapter III - The New Yorker 45
  • Chapter IV - Political Journalism 72
  • Chapter V - The Tribune 85
  • Chapter VI - Queer Company 114
  • Chapter VII - Anti-Slavery 136
  • Chapter VIII - The Republican Party 155
  • Chapter IX - The American Conflict 190
  • Chapter X - Greeley and Lincoln 217
  • Chapter XI - Bailing Jefferson Davis 274
  • Chapter XII - The Busy Life 289
  • Chapter XIII - Husband and Wife 321
  • Chater XIV - Inconsistent Independence 355
  • Chapter XV - Reactions 392
  • Index 411
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