Our Wonderland of Bureaucracy: A Study of the Growth of Bureaucracy in the Federal Government, and Its Destructive Effect upon the Constitution

By James M. Beck | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XI
BUREAUCRACY AND INDIVIDUALISM

"Perhaps, in general, it would be better if Government meddled no farther with trade than to protect it, and let it take its course. Most of the statutes, or acts, edicts, and placards of Parliaments, princes and states for regulating and directing of trade, have, we think, been either political blunders or jobs obtained by artful men for private advantage under pretense of public good."-- BENJAMIN FRANKLIN in Principles of Trade.

LET us now consider the efforts of our federal bureaucracy to investigate and regulate private business. It offers to business much unsolicited and at times unwelcome advice.

The last chapter discussed government-owned corporations, conducting business operations in competition with the taxpayers of the country, and showed that these invasions of the sphere of private business were generally, though not always, accompanied with huge losses paid by the taxpayers in addition to the losses sustained by private business in this unfair competition. This can be supplemented by some consideration of the business activities, which the administrative branches of the Government carry on at the expense of the taxpayers and in direct competition with them.

Probably the War Department conducts the greatest of such activities in its river and harbor work. Congress provided in 1883 that the Secretary of War should perform this work by contract or otherwise, as might be most economical and advantageous to the Government. The "or otherwise" meant that he could dispense with advertising for bids and letting of contracts when in his discretion he believed that it was more economical or advantageous to purchase a Government plant and do the work. Neither the Secretary of War nor his assistant secretaries generally have sufficient practical knowledge to determine whether certain dredging in a particular river or harbor or whether a certain dam or levee should be constructed by government plant or by contract. In

-148-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Wonderland of Bureaucracy: A Study of the Growth of Bureaucracy in the Federal Government, and Its Destructive Effect upon the Constitution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 272

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.