Our Wonderland of Bureaucracy: A Study of the Growth of Bureaucracy in the Federal Government, and Its Destructive Effect upon the Constitution

By James M. Beck | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER XIII
BUREAUCRACY AND APPROPRIATIONS

"Will you walk a little faster?" said a whiting to a snail,
"There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my
tail.
See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!
They are waiting on the shingle--will you come and join the
dance?
Will you, wo'n't you, will you, wo'n't you, will you join the
dance?"

--ALICE IN WONDERLAND.

THE Congress of the Confederation more than a century ago learned the lesson that restrictions and directions in statutes for the expenditure of appropriated moneys are not self-executing and therefore designated a committee of its members to supervise such expenditures. As the number of accounts and claims grew larger, the members of this congressional committee found the task too difficult and by an ordinance of September 26, 1778, the Continental Congress created certain officers to supervise expenditures. A comptroller and auditor were appointed, whose duties were defined in the ordinance as follows:

"That the auditor shall receive the vouchers and accounts from the commissioners to whom he referred them, and cause them to be examined by his clerks. He shall compare the several articles with the vouchers, and if the parties concerned shall appeal from the judgment of the commissioners, he shall call before him the commissioners and the party, and hear them, and then make determination, from whence no appeal shall lie, unless to congress. That after a careful examination of the account as aforesaid, he shall transmit the account and vouchers to the comptroller.

That the comptroller shall keep the treasury books and seal, and shall file all the accounts and

-178-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Our Wonderland of Bureaucracy: A Study of the Growth of Bureaucracy in the Federal Government, and Its Destructive Effect upon the Constitution
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 272

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?