Our Wonderland of Bureaucracy: A Study of the Growth of Bureaucracy in the Federal Government, and Its Destructive Effect upon the Constitution

By James M. Beck | Go to book overview
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CHAPTER XVII
BUREAUCRACY AND REORGANIZATION

"`Now! Now!' cried the Queen. `Faster! Faster!' And they went so fast that at last they seemed to skim through the air, hardly touching the ground with their feet, till suddenly, just as Alice was getting quite exhausted, they stopped, and she found herself sitting on the ground, breathless and giddy.

"The Queen propped her up against a tree, and said kindly, 'You must rest a little, now.'

"Alice looked round her in great surprise. `Why, I do believe we've been under this tree the whole time! Everything's just as it was!'

"`Of course it is,' said the Queen. 'What would you have it?'

"`Well, in our country.' said Alice, still panting a little, `you'd generally get to somewhere else--if you ran very fast for a long time as we've been doing.'

"`A slow sort of country!' said the Queen. `Now, here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!'"--ALICE IN WONDERLAND.

PRESIDENT TAFT, later Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, started the movement for reorganization of the administrative service of the United States, and the American people little realize his contribution to the cause of better and more economical government. At his request Congress made appropriations in the acts of June 25, 1910, and March 3, 1911, to enable him to inquire into the methods of transacting the public business of the various executive departments and other governmental establishments, and to make report as to improved efficiency and greater economy to be obtained in the expenditure of money for the maintenance of the Government.

Mr. Taft appointed a commission of six capable and experienced men to constitute his Committee on Economy and Efficiency. Among these men were Walter W. Warwick, who had served with Mr. Taft when he was a judge in Ohio, was later Comptroller of the Treasury, and had had many years of service in the Government. W. F.

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