Chapter Sixteen

FIRST IMPRESSIONS of a place often prove misleading -- but in this instance they showed a melancholy accuracy. No mining town can ever be a thing of beauty, and Tregenny was certainly, in the local idiom, a "rough shop." The community's existence was centred in the mine, and as the little Tregenny Coal Company, though highly rated for integrity and fair dealing, was not a rich concern, operating at a disadvantage in wet, narrow seams where the coal was of indifferent quality and difficult to "win," and as, moreover, the mining industry in general had, at this period, lapsed into a slump, it was inevitable that local conditions should be bad, with a complete absence of those amenities which one normally expects in a civilised country.

There was no hospital, no ambulance, no X-ray apparatus. The sanitation would hardly bear looking into -- one shuddered at the thought of future epidemics. The houses were damp and in poor repair, many without water, others with washing facilities only at the scullery sink. In such an environment medical practice could hardly conform to the more romantic traditions of the profession.

The company did its best by providing a doctor for the miners and their families, but, inevitably, the standard of men attracted to such an appointment was lamentably low. Thus in recent years Tregenny had seen an irregular coming and going of raw youngsters fresh from college, older practitioners unaware of what they had "let themselves in for," licenced apothecaries with quasi-medical degrees, and, worst of all, a draggled succession of "dead beats,"

-143-

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Adventures in Two Worlds
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Part One 1
  • Chapter One 3
  • Chapter Two 13
  • Chapter Three 22
  • Chapter Four 28
  • Chapter Five 40
  • Chapter Six 50
  • Chapter Seven 59
  • Chapter Eight 68
  • Chapter Nine 75
  • Chapter Ten 82
  • Chapter Eleven 92
  • Chapter Twelve 102
  • Chapter Thirteen 112
  • Chapter Fourteen 123
  • Part Two 133
  • Chapter Fifteen 135
  • Chapter Sixteen 143
  • Chapter Seventeen 151
  • Chapter Eighteen 159
  • Chapter Nineteen 171
  • Part Three 181
  • Chapter Twenty 183
  • Chapter Twenty-One 189
  • Chapter Twenty-Two 200
  • Chapter Twenty-Three 208
  • Chapter Twenty-Four 214
  • Chapter Twenty-Five 222
  • Chapter Twenty-Six 230
  • Chapter Twenty-Seven 236
  • Chapter Twenty-Eight 244
  • Chapter Twenty-Nine 252
  • Part Four 257
  • Chapter Thirty 259
  • Chapter Thirty-One 266
  • Chapter Thirty-Two 275
  • Chapter Thirty-Three 279
  • Chapter Thirty-Four 287
  • Chapter Thirty-Five 292
  • Chapter Thirty-Six 297
  • Chapter Thirty-Seven 301
  • Chapter Thirty-Eight 309
  • Chapter Thirty-Nine 314
  • Chapter Forty 321
  • Chapter Forty-One 328
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