Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process

By Marion Clawson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
A large number of people have contributed in one way or another to this book. In mentioning some, I run the grave risk of omitting others, whose forgiveness is hereby asked. In the first place, extensive use has been made of a very wide range of printed materials; I have drawn ideas, facts, and judgments from scores of persons, many of whom, unfortunately for me, I do not know personally. Material once printed is in the general public domain, and there is no better illustration of this than the use made herein of the writings cited. To all these many persons, my thanks.More directly, I have been helped by a number of colleagues on this study, and by the British research team working on the companion study. Several conferences, many individual discussions, and much correspondence with Peter Hall, Ray Thomas, Roy Drewitt, and Harry L. Gracey of the British group have been most stimulating. They have forced me to explain many matters that seemed obvious to me but were less easily understood by outsiders. George A. McBride spent three years on the RFF staff, working on this project, and we consulted and discussed frequently. His studies of Fairfax County, Virginia, provided many ideas which have been developed in this book. Some very revealing studies of the Wilmington SMSA were made by Gerald L. Cole and Gerald F. Vaughn of the University of Delaware, and their ideas have found expression in many ways in this book.Of particular help was J. B. Wyckoff of the University of Massachusetts. Working under grant from RFF and stationed in RFF offices, he not only made the study of the Springfield SMSA, from which I drew many useful ideas and facts, but also wrote the first draft of Chapter 12 of this book. His counsel and criticism has been particularly valuable throughout the latter part of this study. Joanna Seltzer Hirst served as my research assistant during the summer of 1968, and was very helpful indeed.Others of my colleagues at RFF have also been helpful: Joseph L. Fisher, Michael F. Brewer, Harvey S. Perloff (who has since moved to the University of California at Los Angeles), Lowden Wingo, Irving Hoch, Mason Gaffney, Neal Potter, and others.In addition to these persons, the following reviewed a first draft of this book, and their comments were especially helpful in its revision:
Maurice Ash, Totnes, Devon, England
Robin H. Best, Wye College ( University of London), Near Ashford, Kent*
Robert F. Boxley, Jr., U.S. Department of Agriculture
____________________
*
Organization is listed for identification only; persons were asked to comment as individuals.

-vii-

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