Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process

By Marion Clawson | Go to book overview

11
LAND USE IN THREE STUDY AREAS OF THE NORTHEASTERN URBAN COMPLEX

As a major part of this inquiry into suburban land conversion, three Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas were studied in some detail. Findings are summarized in this chapter and the next.

The three SMSAs studied were Washington, D.C.; Wilmington, Delaware; and Springfield, Massachusetts. The fact that Washington is the national capital gives it special economic characteristics. It is the fourth largest SMSA in the Northeastern Urban Complex -- bigger than Baltimore, but smaller than Boston and, of course, much smaller than Philadelphia and New York. It is also the most southerly SMSA in the Complex. Since World War II the Washington SMSA has had the fastest growth rate among the major SMSAs of the Complex.

Wilmington is about an average-size SMSA, whose rate of growth in the past two decades has been rather rapid. It is the headquarters of some of the largest American industrial firms; some of their manufacturing plants are in its metropolitan area but outside the central city.

Springfield is a relatively old city. Its SMSA was slightly larger than the Wilmington SMSA in 1960, but its growth rate has been low in recent decades.

Each of these SMSAs has climate, topography, and soils common to the whole Northeastern Urban Complex as described in Chapter 10, although there are variations which locally are highly important. Washington was located at the head of navigation on the Potomac River, but the river is more important today as a source of water than as a means of transportation. Wilmington is located on the Delaware River, where transportation was once highly important and is moderately so today. Springfield is on the Connecticut River far above significant water transportation, but water power from the river was important in its early industrial development. All have air, rail, and highway transportation services of varying quality today.

Washington draws official visitors and tourists from over the nation and from other parts of the world, but it makes and exports few goods. The other two SMSAs produce goods of various kinds which are shipped to other urban areas in and outside of the Complex. While each of these SMSAs is physically distinct from others, each is closely interrelated with many other urban areas in economy and culture.

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.