Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process

By Marion Clawson | Go to book overview

14
THE EMERGING REGIONAL URBAN COMPLEX

The Northeastern Urban Complex, as defined in this study, is clearly highly urban in its concentration of a large population within a limited area and in its style of living. It is equally clearly a complex of cities, SMSAs, and urbanized areas. But is it, in any meaningful sense, an integrated region or integrated regional megalopolis? Is it anything more than a large collection of urban centers within a region which is moderately small on the U.S. geographical scale? The degree of unity or of integration of the geographic area is the subject of this chapter.

Gottmann first applied the term "megalopolis" to this region, and hence it is desirable to study what he meant by the term.1 Did he view the region as primarily a large collection of cities (or SMSAs or urbanized areas) within a limited geographical space, with obvious and natural interconnections between the various centers? Or did he view it as something more -- an integrated regional megalopolis, set apart in some way or to some degree from other urban areas of the United States and the world, with a unity and a character beyond that of a mere collection of urban centers?

Unfortunately for the present purpose, the more one studies Gottmann, the less sure one can be as to exactly what he does mean. The problem is perhaps partly one of semantics. Just what meaning and connotations attach to such words as "megalopolis," "complex," "integrated"? Perhaps the problem is more difficult. The kind of population pattern along the northeastern seaboard is, Gottmann asserts with logic, in some degree unique in the world's history. Hence one neither fully understands it nor finds words that exactly portray his meaning.

Many of Gottmann's statements lend support to the idea that he conceived of the Northeastern Urban Complex as a regionally integrated megalopolis, something more than a mere collection of urban areas. He refers to "the enormous and powerful concentration of people and activities now achieved" in the region (p. ix). The opening chapter declares that:

. . . the processes of urbanization, rooted deep in the American past, have worked steadily here, endowing the region with unique ways of life and of land use. No other section of the United States has such a large concentration

____________________
1
Jean Gottmann, Megalopolis -- The Urbanized Northeastern Seaboard of the United States ( New York: Twentieth Century Fund, 1961). Mumford and Geddes, who used this term earlier, did not apply it to this region.

-308-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Suburban Land Conversion in the United States: An Economic and Governmental Process
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.