Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth

By Erlene Stetson; Linda David | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Our work grew out of a convergence of separate endeavors and we have first of all to thank each other for the sustenance and joy we found in our collaboration. A circle of friends helped the work to grow over a long period and we thank each member of it. The assistance of Jean Phoenix Laurel and Phyllis Guskin was crucial, as was the long-term support of Harriet McCombs, co- editor of Sojourner: A Third World Women's Research Newsletter, Elizabeth Kennedy, Barbara Halporn, Fritz Senn, Gayle Margherita, Mischa Senn, Joan M. Zirker, Angelina Maccarone, Rob Fulk, Joanna G. Williams, Fatima El-Tayeb and Fareedah Allah. We are grateful as well to Melanie Walder, Virginia Munroe, Tom Karr, Geraldine White, Judith Rose Gettelfinger, Sylvia Escher, Kathryn Crittenden, and Brigit Keller.

Our families helped us and we warmly thank Al David and Gerd Knoblauch, La Nicerra Stetson, La Quetta Stetson, and Benjamin David. Throughout the writing of this book we were paying tribute to the memory of our mothers, Rose Green Hawkins and Alma Louise Utz.

Thanks are due to Karl Kabelac, Manuscripts Librarian, and to Molly Solazzo of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of Rochester Library, and to Laura V. Monti, Keeper of Rare Books and Manuscripts and to R. Eugene Zepp, Reference Librarian in the Division of Rare Books and Manuscripts of the Boston Public Library. We are especially grateful to Sue Presnell, Head of Reference Services and to Heather Munro of the Manuscripts Department of the Lilly Library, Indiana University. For helping us to eliminate a false lead we think Cathy Cherbosque, Curator of Literary Manuscripts, and Karen Kearns, Archivist, at The Henry Huntington Library. Much of our research originated under the expert guidance of the late Wilmer Baatz of the Indiana University Black Culture Center Library; he was a learned and tireless friend to scholarship.

Julie L. Loehr of the Michigan State University Press has consistently supported the book. Kristine M. Blakeslee has been an ideal editor, thoughtful, questioning, and ceaselessly encouraging. It is our great pleasure to see our book appear alongside MSU Press's Lotus Poetry Series. Our collaboration really begin in a rare books library reading together the poetry of Naomi Long Madgett.

Erlene Stetson, Berlin

Linda David, Bloomington

-xi-

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Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - Speaking of Shadows 1
  • Notes 24
  • Two - The Country of the Slave 29
  • Notes 51
  • Three - The Claims of Human Brotherhood 57
  • Notes 81
  • Four - Sojourners 87
  • Notes 120
  • Five - I Saw the Wheat Holding Up Its Head 129
  • Notes 156
  • Six - Harvest Time for the Black Man, and Seed-Sowing Time for Woman: Nancy Works in the Cotton Field 163
  • Notes 194
  • Appendices 201
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 235
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