Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth

By Erlene Stetson; Linda David | Go to book overview

Truth wrote to Amy Post, "I sold a good many books at the Convention and have thus far been greatly prospered." She was now part of another network through which she could disseminate her writing, locate audiences, and move from place to place. She told Post that at the Convention she had "found plenty of kind friends just like you & they gave me so many kind invitations I hardly knew which to accept of first."107

Truth's mission had expanded beyond the preaching of her sojourning sisters, who continued to carry the still radical message that they had been authorized by God to speak, to act, to change lives, working their changes on the power structure of Christian patriarchy. At Akron, Truth went a different way. While she never denied the power of the Spirit in sustaining her life work, at Akron Truth had drawn on a uniquely modern and secular source of authorization and empowerment: her own lived history of resilience, what she would famously come to call "the deeds of my body."


Notes
1.
Amanda Berry Smith, An Autobiography: The Story of the Lord's Dealings with Mrs. Amanda Smith the Colored Evangelist ( Chicago: Meyer & Brother, 1893), 116-17.
2.
In the Old Testament the Sojourn is the period the Jacob tribes resided in Egypt, from the time they told Pharaoh "For to sojourn in the land are we come," to the Exodus. Relating "sojourn" to "Egypt" are Genesis 12:10; 47:4; Exodus 12:40; Deuteronomy 26:5; Isaiah 53:4; and Jeremiah 42:15, 17; 43:2; 44:12, 14.
3.
Stowe, "Sojourner Truth, the Libyan Sibyl,"478.
4.
Phillis Wheatley, "On the Death of the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield. 1770," Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral ( London: A. Bell, 1773),23.
5.
C. Eric Lincoln and Lawrence H. Mamiya, The Black Church in the African American Experience, 47-50 and 346-81; William D. Piersen, Black Yankees, 66-73.
6.
Jupiter Hammon, An Address to the Negroes in the State of New York, by Jupiter Hammon, Servant of John Lloyd, jun, Esq of the Manor of Queen's Village, Long Island ( New York: Carroll and Patterson, 1786), quoted in Milton C. Sernett, ed., Afro-American Religious History: A Documentary Witness (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1985), 37.
7.
See Sherley A. Williams, "The Blues Roots of Contemporary Afro- American Poetry," in Chant of Saints: A Gathering of Afro-American Literature, Art, and Scholarship, edited by Michael S. Harper and Robert B. Stepto (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1979), 125-26.
8.
Stowe, "Sojourner Truth, the Libyan Sibyl,"479. See Sarah Bradford, Harriet Tubman: The Moses of Her People (Secaucus, New Jersey: The

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Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • One - Speaking of Shadows 1
  • Notes 24
  • Two - The Country of the Slave 29
  • Notes 51
  • Three - The Claims of Human Brotherhood 57
  • Notes 81
  • Four - Sojourners 87
  • Notes 120
  • Five - I Saw the Wheat Holding Up Its Head 129
  • Notes 156
  • Six - Harvest Time for the Black Man, and Seed-Sowing Time for Woman: Nancy Works in the Cotton Field 163
  • Notes 194
  • Appendices 201
  • Bibliography 219
  • Index 235
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