Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth

By Erlene Stetson; Linda David | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
[ Holley], A Life for Liberty, 62-64.
2.
Ibid., 80-81.
3.
Lucy Colman, Reminiscences, 65.
4.
Stowe, "Sojourner Truth, the Libyan Sibyl,"478. Stowe did not recall exactly which antislavery texts, so she used as her example "Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof," the famous slogan of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Truth spread the banner over the pulpit in 1853 when she lectured in New York City. According to the report in the Tribune, 8 November 1853, the slogans included the even more famous "Am I not a Woman and a Sister": "Pendant from the pulpit cushion was a banner of white satin, on which was inscribed: Ashtabula County. / Am I not a Woman and a Sister! / [Kneeling figure of a woman with uplifted hands.] / How long, O Lord! how long. / A Million-and-a- half of American Women in chains. / Shall we heed their wrongs? / Will not a righteous God be avenged upon / such a Nation as this!"
5.
Wyman, American Chivalry, 107.
6.
Douglas, The Feminization of American Culture, 317.
7.
Anti-Slavery Bugle, 4 September 1852.
8.
For an attempted reconstruction of this exchange through five contemporary newspaper accounts, see Mabee and Newhouse, Sojourner Truth, 83-88.
9.
Anti-Slavery Bugle, 28 August 1852. For an analysis of the Constitutional debate between these factions, see Lewis Perry, Radical Abolitionism: Anarchy and the Government of God in Anti-Slavery Thought ( Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1973), 188-208.
10.
The passage is our translation of the following dialect rendering of Truth's vision by Joseph Dugdale, which was printed in National Anti-Slavery Standard, 4 July 1863:

Children, I talks to God and God talks to me. I goes out and talks to God in de fields and de woods. [The weevil had destroyed thousands of acres of wheat in the West that year.] Dis morning I was walking out, and I got over de fence. I saw de wheat a holding up its head, looking very big. I goes up and takes holt ob it. You b'lieve it, dere was no wheat dare? I says, God [speaking the name in a voice of reverence peculiar to herself], what is de matter wid dis wheat? and he says to me, " Sojourner, dere is a little weasel in it." Now I hears talkin' about de Constitution and de rights of man. I comes up and I takes hold of dis Constitution. It looks mighty big, and I feels for my rights, but der aint any dare. Den I says, God, what ails dis Constitution? He says to me, " Sojourner, dere is a little weasel in it."

11.
See John R. McKivigan, "The Frederick Douglass-Gerrit Smith Friendship and Political Abolitionism in the 1850s," in Frederick Douglass: New Literary and Historical Essays, edited by Eric J. Sundquist ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990), 205-32, for the stages of Douglass's evolution into political action and the presidential election year politics of 1852.

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Glorying in Tribulation: The Lifework of Sojourner Truth
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.