The Global Positioning System: Assessing National Policies

By Scott Pace; Gerald Frost et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors would like to thank Richard DalBello, Jeff Hofgard, Steven Moran, and William Clements of the Office of Science and Technology Policy for their assistance in and support for this research. For professional assistance, we are deeply indebted to Jules McNeff of the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition and Technology), Major Lee Carrick and Major Matt Brennan of the Air Staff, and Colonel Michael Wiedemer of the GPS Joint Program Office. We appreciate their gracious tolerance of our many questions.

We would also like to thank the U.S. GPS Industry Council, the Council's vice president for policy, Ann Ciganer, and executive secretary, Michael Swiek, for their insights into the commercial potential and challenges of GPS technology and the importance of U.S. policy decisions. We benefited from the kind assistance of Mr. H. Nishiguchi and Dr. M. Mizumachi of the Japan GPS Council and. Mr. A. Fujita of the Embassy of Japan in Washington in gaining a better understanding of Japanese interests in GPS.

GPS is a technology that cuts across traditional lines, and we would like to express our appreciation to the many individuals who took the time to meet with us, provide us with references, and improve our understanding of how GPS technology is affecting many disparate interests. We would like to especially mention Charles Trimble of Trimble Navigation, Olof Lundberg and Jim Nagle of The International Mobile Satellite Organisation ( INMARSAT), George Wiggers of the Office of the Secretary of Transportation, Dr. George Donohue and Norm Solat of the Federal Aviation Administration, Captain Chris Shank of the 50th Space Wing, U.S. Air Force Space Command, Captain Kenneth Smith of the U.S. Air Force Space and Missiles Systems Center, and Rob Conley and Ed Stephenson of Overlook Technologies.

While this study was being conducted, there were related GPS efforts under way at the National Academy of Public Administration ( NAPA), the National Research Council ( NRC), and the Defense Science Board ( DSB). We benefited from invitations to attend working panels of these studies and, in the case of

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The Global Positioning System: Assessing National Policies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxix
  • Acronyms xxxi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - National Interests and Stakeholders in Gps Policy 11
  • Chapter Three - National Security Assessment 45
  • Chapter Four - Commercial Assessment 93
  • Chapter Five - Institutional and Legal Assessment 163
  • Chapter Six - Conclusions and Recommendations 195
  • Appendix A - Gps Technologies and Alternatives 217
  • Appendix B - Gps History, Chronology, and Budgets 237
  • Appendix C - Gps Policy References 271
  • Appendix D - International Legal References for Gps 293
  • Bibliography 305
  • Gps Interviews 361
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