CHAPTER III
THE SUPPLY

Relation of demand and supply. -- Demand increased by forcing supply. -- Supply derived mainly from lower working classes. -- Occupations of parents. -- Occupations of women themselves. -- Is the prostitute a born degenerate? -- Importance of the milieu. -- Effect of loosening home ties. -- Broken homes. -- Demoralization of minors. -- Unmarried mothers. -- Influence of bad example. -- Economic pressure. -- Low and irregular wages. -- Perilous employments. -- Efforts to improve conditions. -- Rescue work. -- Volume of supply. -- Forced supply. -- White slavery. -- Employment agencies. -- The pimp, bars, variety theaters, etc. -- Rescue and preventive work. -- Supply capable of modification through laws and social conditions.

THE supply, which after a fashion responds to the demand just described, must be considered from three distinct points of view: its sources, its volume, its reaction on demand itself. On the face of it, the general relation of demand and supply appears simple and mechanical: a demand exists; somehow, thereupon, a supply springs up to meet it. The demand thus recognized, a moving equilibrium is established. Unquestionably, as the situation now stands, prostitution to a certain extent illustrates this purely mechanical conception. There is a demand of such strength and upon such terms that a supply is forthcoming: in so far as this particular demand is concerned, outright efforts simply to deny its satisfaction would for the most part lead to higher bidding or to circuitous methods of gratification. Demand itself must be affected before this sit

-61-

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