International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration - Vol. 2

By Jay M. Shafritz | Go to book overview
Since the 1980s, there has been a committed effort to privatize nationalized industries in several nations, including Great Britain, Ireland, India, and much of Eastern Europe. Interestingly enough, even as the United States has been quick to champion the cause of private competition throughout the world, it has been slow to privatize its own government corporations. There appears to be an unwillingness among Americans to equate their government corporations with the public enterprises found in other nations, even though there are as many similarities as differences. JERRY MITCHELL
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Axelrod, Donald, 1992. Shadow; Government. The Hidden World of Public Authorities -- And How They Control over $1 Trillion of Your Money. New York: John Wiley.

Caro, Robert, 1974. The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York. New York: Vintage Books.

Cohen, Julius Henry, 1946. They Builded Better Than They Knew. New York: Julian Messner.

Dimock, Marshall E., 1934. Government-Operated Enterprises in the Panama Canal Zone. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Doig, Jameson W., 1983. "'If I See A Murderous Fellow Sharpening a Knife Cleverly'. . . The Wilson Dichotomy and the Public Authority Tradition". Public Administration Review 43 (July/August): 292-304.

Henriques, Diana, 1986. The Machinery of Greed. Public Authority Abuse and What to Do About It. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books.

Mitchell, Jerry, 1993. "Accountability and the Management of Public Authorities in the United States", International Review of Administrative Sciences 59 (September): 477-492.

-----, ed., 1992. Public Authorities and Public Policy: The Business of Government. New York: Greenwood Press.

National Academy of Public Administration, (NAPC) 1981. Report on Government Corporations. Washington, DC: NAPC.

Seidman, Harold, 1954. "The Government Corporation: Organization and Controls". Public Administration Review; 14 (Summer): 183-192.

Selznick, Philip, 1966. TVA and the Grassroots: A Study in the Sociology of Formal Organizations. New York: Harper & Row.

Thurston, John, 1937. Government Proprietary Corporations in the English-Speaking Countries. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Van Harold A. Dorn, 1926. Government Owned Corporations. New York: Knopf.

Walsh, Annmarie Hauck, 1978. The Public's Business: The Politics and Practices of Government Corporations. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Wettenhall, Roger, 1978. "Public Enterprise in Eight Countries: A Comparative Survey". Australian Journal of Public Administration 37 (December): 398-403.

GOVERNMENT FAILURE . A segment of economic theory that explains the conditions under which governmental provision of public goods and services is inefficient. Charles Wolf, Jr. ( 1979) described a variety of circumstances under which government intervention in the private economy to correct market failures may produce new inefficiencies and conditions under which government may over- or underproduce public services or provide them at too high of a cost.Government failure is an important component in the theory of private nonprofit organizations. In particular, this body of theory has been used to explain why private nonprofit organizations arise to provide public goods and services on a voluntary basis, even in the presence of governmental provision. Government failure theory applied to nonprofit organizations focuses on the limitations of government and how private nonprofit organizations may fill in the niches left unserved by governmental action ( Hansmann 1987). James Douglas ( 1983, 1987) identified five sources of constraint on governmental action that create unsatisfied demands for public service to which private nonprofits may respond:
1. The "categorical constraint" results from the necessity of governments to provide goods and services on a uniform and universal basis. This constraint implies that the demands of individuals whose preferences for public services differ from the norm will go unsatisfied. This situation creates niches for nonprofit organizations to provide additional public services on a voluntary basis. Moreover, since government must provide its services universally to all its citizens, it is limited in its ability to experiment on a small scale with new programs, which creates another niche for private nonprofit organizations.
2. The "majoratarian constraint" of government reflects the fact that in a diverse population there may be multiple conception of the public good and what government should be doing. If government responds to the majority, it leaves niches for private nonprofit organizations to respond to minority issues and demands.
3. The "time horizon" constraint of government reflects the relatively short tenures of government officeholders and their consequent incentive to focus on short term-issues and results. This constraint leaves another area of action for private nonprofit organizations-the addressing of long-term societal issues and concerns.
4. The "knowledge constraint" connotes that government bureaucracies are organized in a relatively monolithic, hierarchical way and, hence, cannot be expected to generate all of the relevant information, ideas, and research needed for intelligent decisionmaking on public issues. This, too, creates a niche for private nonprofit advocacy groups, research centers, and other institutions.
5. The "size constraint" reflects the view that government bureaucracy is typically large and intimidating, thus, it is difficult for ordinary citizens to engage government. This situation creates a niche for nonprofit organizations to serve as "mediating institutions"

-1006-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Board *
  • Title Page *
  • D 627
  • Bibliography 627
  • Bibliography 630
  • Bibliography 631
  • Bibliography 633
  • Bibliography 635
  • Bibliography 635
  • Bibliography 639
  • Bibliography 643
  • Bibliography 645
  • Bibliography 647
  • Bibliography 651
  • Bibliography 654
  • Bibliography 656
  • Bibliography 662
  • Bibliography 665
  • Bibliography 666
  • Bibliography 669
  • Bibliography 674
  • Bibliography 676
  • Bibliography 677
  • Bibliography 679
  • Bibliography 682
  • Bibliography 684
  • Bibliography 684
  • Bibliography 687
  • Bibliography 689
  • Bibliography 690
  • Bibliography 692
  • Bibliography 694
  • Bibliography 695
  • Bibliography 700
  • Bibliography 701
  • Bibliography 704
  • Bibliography 706
  • Bibliography 706
  • Bibliography 707
  • Bibliography 708
  • Bibliography 711
  • Bibliography 714
  • Bibliography 720
  • Bibliography 723
  • Bibliography 728
  • Bibliography 728
  • E 729
  • Bibliography 730
  • Bibliography 734
  • Bibliography 736
  • Bibliography 738
  • Bibliography 741
  • Bibliography 745
  • Bibliography 746
  • Bibliography 747
  • Bibliography 752
  • Bibliography 753
  • Bibliography 756
  • Bibliography 763
  • Bibliography 764
  • Bibliography 768
  • Bibliography 772
  • Bibliography 773
  • Bibliography 777
  • Bibliography 785
  • Bibliography 789
  • Bibliography 790
  • Bibliography 793
  • Bibliography 795
  • Bibliography 802
  • Bibliography 803
  • Bibliography 806
  • Bibliography 808
  • Bibliography 818
  • Bibliography 822
  • Bibliography 824
  • Bibliography 825
  • Bibliography 827
  • Bibliography 832
  • Bibliography 837
  • Bibliography 841
  • Bibliography 844
  • Bibliography 852
  • F 853
  • Bibliography 854
  • Bibliography 857
  • Bibliography 861
  • Bibliography 862
  • Bibliography 865
  • References 875
  • Bibliography 881
  • Bibliography 883
  • Bibliography 884
  • Bibliography 887
  • Bibliography 891
  • Bibliography 895
  • Bibliography 898
  • Bibliography 901
  • Bibliography 905
  • Bibliography 906
  • Bibliography 913
  • Bibliography 914
  • Bibliography 915
  • Bibliography 917
  • Bibliography 921
  • Bibliography 922
  • Bibliography 923
  • Bibliography 927
  • Bibliography 928
  • Bibliography 935
  • Bibliography 938
  • Bibliography 941
  • Bibliography 944
  • Bibliography 945
  • Bibliography 947
  • Bibliography 949
  • Bibliography 950
  • Bibliography 952
  • Bibliography 957
  • Bibliography 960
  • G 961
  • Bibliography 962
  • Bibliography 964
  • Bibliography 968
  • Bibliography 972
  • Bibliography 973
  • Bibliography 979
  • Bibliography 982
  • Bibliography 983
  • Bibliography 984
  • Bibliography 989
  • Bibliography 990
  • Bibliography 993
  • Bibliography 996
  • Bibliography 998
  • Bibliography 1002
  • Bibliography 1006
  • Bibliography 1007
  • Bibliography 1010
  • Bibliography 1014
  • Bibliography 1017
  • Bibliography 1018
  • Bibliography 1019
  • Bibliography 1023
  • Bibliography 1025
  • Bibliography 1030
  • Bibliography 1031
  • Bibliography 1035
  • H 1037
  • Bibliography 1039
  • Bibliograhy 1042
  • Bibliography 1046
  • Bibliography 1053
  • Bibliography 1058
  • Bibliography 1059
  • Bibliography 1061
  • Bibliography 1065
  • Bibliography 1069
  • Bibliography 1071
  • Bibliography 1072
  • Bibliography 1077
  • Bibliography 1078
  • Bibliography 1080
  • Bibliography 1080
  • Bibliography 1082
  • I 1083
  • Bibliography 1086
  • Bibliography 1087
  • Bibliography 1091
  • Bibliography 1093
  • Bibliography 1097
  • Bibliography 1098
  • Bibliography 1100
  • Bibliography 1101
  • Bibliography 1105
  • Bibliography 1109
  • Bibliography 1110
  • Bibliography 1115
  • Bibliography 1120
  • Bibliography 1126
  • Bibliography 1129
  • Bibliography 1130
  • Bibliography 1133
  • Bibliography 1136
  • Bibliography 1138
  • Bibliography 1139
  • Bibliography 1141
  • Bibliography 1144
  • Bibliography 1145
  • Bibliography 1151
  • Bibliography 1154
  • Bibliography 1156
  • Bibliography 1159
  • Bibliography 1161
  • Bibliography 1167
  • Bibliography 1181
  • Bibliography 1191
  • Bibliography 1196
  • Bibliography 1198
  • Bibliography 1200
  • Bibliography 1201
  • J 1207
  • Bibliography 1210
  • Bibliography 1210
  • Bibliography 1219
  • Bibliography 1220
  • Bibliography 1222
  • Bibliography 1224
  • Bibliography 1224
  • Bibliography 1228
  • Bibliography 1233
  • Bibliography 1236
  • Bibliography 1238
  • K 1239
  • Bibliography 1240
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 1240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.