The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948

By Norman D. Markowitz | Go to book overview

NOTES
*
Hubert H. Humphrey to HAW, April 12, 1945, HAW Papers, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
1
New York Times, July 22, 1944; Lord Russell, The Wallaces of Iowa ( Boston, 1947), p. 538. The Wallace Papers in the Library of Congress are the best source for letters of condolence after the convention. See HAW Papers, Boxes 26 and 28 especially.
2
HAW, Address to the Iowa State Democratic Convention, July 29, 1944, in Congressional Record, 78 Congress, 2 Session, p. 3483; New York Times, August 25, 30, 1944; P.M., September 22, 1944.
3
Sidney Hillman, "The Truth About PAC", New Republic, CXI ( August 21, 1944), pp. 209-211; Delbert D. Arnold, "The CIO in American Politics, 1936-1948" (Ph.D. thesis, University of Maryland, 1952), pp. 225-227. For examples of the standard liberal response to the committees, see Bruce Bliven, "The Liberals After Chicago", New Republic, CXI ( August 7, 1944), p. 154, and Freda Kirchwey, "Campaign Notes", Nation, CLIX ( September 30, 1944), p. 369.
4
Detroit Free Press, October 8, 1944; Baltimore Sun, October 14, 30, November 2, 1944.
5
FDR to HAW, November 1, 1944, HAW to FDR, November 7, 1944, FDR Papers, PPF 41, Wallace Folder.
6
HAW to FDR, November 7, 1944, FDR Papers, PPF 41, Wallace Folder.
7
For a summary of attacks against PAC, see Fred Maguire, "The Press Gangup on the PAC", New Republic, CXI ( October 30, 1944), pp. 558-563. For Rankin's maneuver, see Walter Goodman, The Committee ( New York, 1968), pp. 168-169.
8
FDR to HAW, July 21, 1944, FDR Papers, PPF41; for the FAO story see Howard Tolley Interview, COHC (this story is told by other Wallace intimates).
9
John M. Blum, ed., From the Morgenthau Diaries ( Boston, 1967), III, p. 392; "Wallace For Secretary of State", New Republic, CXI ( November 20, 1944), p. 465; New York Times, November 4, 1944. Russell Lord notes that Roosevelt first told Wallace of the cabinet posts open on August 29 and "Wallace chose Commerce." Perhaps Lord, as is true at many points in his work, has confused time and place. My interview with C. B. Baldwin and Wallace's letters to Roosevelt suggest that the Vice President made no clear choice for the Commerce post until after the elections. Lord, Wallaces of Iowa, pp. 543-44.
10
New York Times, October 28, 1944; HAW, Address to CIO Convention, November 21, 1944, in Congressional Record, 78 Congress, 2 Session, p. A4492.
11
Executive Order 9071, February 24, 1942, FDR Papers, OF 3, Commerce Department; to understand liberal feeling against Jones, see Jesse Jones and Edward Angly, Fifty Billion Dollars ( New York, 1951).

-155-

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The Rise and Fall of the People's Century: Henry A. Wallace and American Liberalism, 1941-1948
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Prelude to the People's Century 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Keeper of the Flame 36
  • Notes 74
  • 3 - The Missouri Compromise of 1944 81
  • Notes 117
  • 4 - Reconversion and Reaction 124
  • Notes 155
  • 5 - From Stettin in the Baltic 160
  • Notes 193
  • 6 - A Crisis of the American Spirit 200
  • Notes 226
  • 7 - Manifest Destiny, 1947: the Triumph of Containment 231
  • Notes 260
  • 8 - The Last Battle 266
  • Notes 297
  • 9 - The Twenty-First Century 304
  • Notes 328
  • Appendix: the Mysticism Legend 333
  • Notes 341
  • Select Bibliographical Essay 343
  • Index 361
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